Optimal Diet is a dietary model of human nutrition devised and implemented by Dr. Jan Kwasniewski. Lots of fat and low in carbs. Lots and lots of articles collected from various places. He has an out-of-print book: Optimal Nutrition. The book is explained at the Australian Homo Optimus Association website. A thorough analysis is the first post here: Dr. Kwasniewski's Optimal Diet: Sanity, Clarity, Facts.
Adoption of the Paleolithic diet assumes that modern humans can reproduce the hunter-gatherer diet. Molecular biologist Marion Nestle argues that "knowledge of the relative proportions of animal and plant foods in the diets of early humans is circumstantial, incomplete, and debatable and that there are insufficient data to identify the composition of a genetically determined optimal diet. The evidence related to Paleolithic diets is best interpreted as supporting the idea that diets based largely on plant foods promote health and longevity, at least under conditions of food abundance and physical activity."[34] Ideas about Paleolithic diet and nutrition are at best hypothetical.[35]
By the second week I started to notice that my face and my stomach looked less puffy. Score! I saw this as a sign that inflammation in my system was going down. One of the most remarkable changes was in my mood. I felt generally happy and positive. I would say I’m a positive person in general, but I do get stressed out easily. The margin for getting really stressed got a little thicker, and I was simply able to deal better.

Sport-specific athletes – Like the specialists, if you are an athlete training for a sport, you’d be better off finding a coach that is trained in getting great performances out of athletes in your specific sport. Every sport has special movements that require certain types of power in specific muscles. CrossFit prepares you for everything, but won’t improve your specific sport skills unless you are training for those specific sport skills! Many athletes choose to combine CrossFit with sport-specific workouts (see things like CrossFit Football) in their off-season for conditioning, but that’s up to each sport’s coach.


Get takeout flavor without the mystery additives: This Whole30 recipe recreates a comfort food classic with clean ingredients like fresh ginger, steak, and broccoli. Stay more Bulletproof and use grass-fed beef, arrowroot starch, coconut aminos, and coconut oil to cook. Plus, avoid enjoying black pepper and garlic too often, and consider steaming broccoli instead of stir frying.
The paleo diet (also nicknamed the caveman diet, primal diet, Stone Age diet, and hunter-gatherer diet) is hugely popular these days, and goes by one simple question: What would a caveman eat? Here, we explain what the paleo diet involves, its pros and cons, and, ultimately, what a modern person needs to know to decide whether or not to take the paleo diet plunge.

After that initial hump, things got a lot better. I had energy to do some things that I usually had no energy to do. I was doing yoga, and was able to go on walks. This was a big deal for me. Going through treatment for Lyme Disease is exhausting. Often I feel like I don’t have enough air to hold up my body — it’s a feeling of intense can’t-get-out-of-bed-exhaustion. So to have a little more pep in my step felt invaluable.
On 4 June 2014, CrossFit uploaded a "parody video to their Facebook page" of Jesus, featuring concepts such as the "Holy Trinity of exercise".[83] Yasmine Hafiz wrote in The Huffington Post that some "viewers are outraged at the disrespectful use of a Christian symbol", with one user asking "on what planet is it comical or encouraged to mock someones belief?"[84][83]
Get rid of the temptation – if you’re gonna go at this thing with a full head of steam, remove all the junk food from your house.  It’s going to take a few weeks for your body to adjust to burning fat instead of glucose, and you might want to eat poorly here and there. If there’s no food in your house to tempt you, it will be much easier to stay on target.

We want you to be a part of our community. We want you to take this seriously, and see amazing results in unexpected areas. We want you to look, feel, and live better than you have in years—or maybe ever. We want you to find lasting food freedom. Even if you don’t believe this will actually change your life, if you’re willing to give it 30 short days, DO IT. It is that important. We believe in it that much. It changed our lives, and we want it to change yours too.
Snacks: Snacks were a problem for me. One of favorite snacks is cheese, but dairy was not allowed in the program. One of the most recommended snacks is nuts, but I can’t have them because I have diverticulosis. My fall back was celery with almond butter. It seem to fill me up while meeting the requirements of the Whole 30 plan but it was pretty boring.
The CrossFit affiliate proposition is simple: delivering increased work capacity across broad time and modal domains has extraordinary value for other people because it is uniquely effective in producing fitness and health. CrossFit’s decentralized affiliate model supports but does not usurp that value by refraining from taking those things for itself that are best managed, delivered, and owned by fiercely independent CrossFit boxes. The value is inherent in CrossFit’s physiology, but the economic opportunity resides in the 15,000 affiliates, not CrossFit, Inc. 
Why so strict? According to the diet's founders, Melissa and Dallas Hartwig, these are the foods that are most likely to cause inflammation and gut damage. They're also the foods that the founders say destabilize blood sugar levels and lead to cravings. But it's hard to say whether that's true for everyone. In general, limiting sugar and alcohol is always a good idea. But dairy, grains, and legumes? They don't trigger an inflammatory response in everyone, Haas says.
Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrat by Mary G. Enig, Ph.D. and Sally Fallon. The premise is the culinary traditions of our ancestors, and the food choices and preparation techniques of healthy nonindustrialized peoples, should serve as the model for contemporary eating habits. However, they push whole grains and dairy, which aren't Paleolithic.
Two years ago I got formally diagnosed with chronic Lyme Disease. You can read more about that and what it means here. In my health journey, one of my goals has been to reduce inflammation in my system. There are a ton of factors that go into this, but one of the things I can control is the food I put into my body. Food, and restoring gut health, is a huge part of reversing chronic illness.
Anything that comes in a box, jar, or bag should be avoided on the paleo diet—as should anything that just wasn't consumed back then. That means no grains, dairy, added salt, or legumes (including peanuts, beans, lentils, and soybeans), according to Robb Wolf, a former research biochemist, paleo expert, and author of The Paleo Solution. While potatoes are generally outlawed on the diet, Wolff says they are okay to eat sparingly as long as you earn them through exercise (more on that next). Alcohol and honey are also generally considered paleo no-nos, but red wine tends to be the closest option there is to a paleo drink, and honey is far preferred to table sugar or artificial sweeteners.
Is time-restricted eating effective for weight loss? Time-restricted eating is a diet plan that requires people to limit themselves to only eating during specific hours of the day and then fasting outside of this period. Here, we look at what time-restricted eating is, whether or not it works, and what effect it has on muscle gain. We also provide tips for beginners. Read now
Interestingly, all of these seemingly unrelated diseases share a common cause: damage to the intestinal lining which allows large, undigested food particles to make their way into the body. This is called “leaky gut and the autoimmune response”. Here is a 7-part video series by Prof. Loren Cordain describing the etiology of Multiple Sclerosis. And please watch this TED talk by Dr. Terry Wahls, MD as she describes how she reversed her Multiple Sclerosis with a paleo diet. If you have an autoimmune disease you might consider trying the autoimmune protocol of the paleo diet. If you do, please tell us about your experience.

Excluding foods. The exclusion of entire categories of commonly eaten foods like whole grains and dairy requires frequent label reading in the supermarket and in restaurants. It may also increase the risk of deficiencies such as calcium, vitamin D, and B vitamins, if these nutrients are not consistently eaten from the allowed foods or a vitamin supplement. For example, there are some nondairy calcium-rich foods that are absorbed well by the body such as collard and turnip greens or canned bone-in sardines and salmon, but you would have to eat five or more servings of these greens and fish bones daily to meet recommended calcium needs. (Note that some greens like spinach that are touted to be calcium-rich also contain oxalates and phytates that bind to calcium so very little is actually absorbed.) One small, short-term intervention study of healthy participants showed a 53% decrease from baseline in calcium intake after following a Paleo diet for three weeks. [8] Furthermore, the exclusion of whole grains can result in reduced consumption of beneficial nutrients such as fiber and thus may increase one’s risk for diabetes and heart disease.
While I understand why people may like this book, this is not the book for me. I am all for healthy eating and an active lifestyle so I can appreciate the lengthy explanation of this program for those who want that. However, I found most of the information completely common sense. Several times I thought if you follow a healthy diet you would know this stuff, and if your diet is not healthy a lot of this stuff you should know anyway. Also unless you have never cooked a day in your life, there really is no need for what kitchen equipment you should have. if you cook, you know what you need. Also do not waste my time by adding pages of shopping lists - this is a complete waste of space. I digress, I bought this book simply for the fact that I was looking for some new healthy recipes to add to what I already cook. Recipes do not start until page 149 (they end on 392)- not every page has a recipe. its recipe usually followed by a full color page of what the recipe looks like when complete. With that said, the recipes in general are bland and some are so simple I can't believe they wasted a page by including it as a recipe (i.e., perfect boiled eggs, roasted sweet potatoes). I cook often and I really can't find a single recipe in here that I couldn't come up with myself or for the few that are a bit more fancy I have seen elsewhere. I actually just look at this book and shake my head in disgust for buying it. It only gets 2 stars because the book itself looks nice and the pictures included make the food look good.
The Vegetarian Myth: Food, Justice, and Sustainability by Lierre Keith is against industrial farming. She spent 20 years as a vegan, and now reveals the risks of a vegan diet, and explains why animals belong on ecologically sound farms. And as all the neolithic foods we avoid are produced on industrial farms, she is against the foods we avoid. Here's a well thought out review by Eric Wargo: Clubbing Vegetarians Over the Head With the Truth.
Get takeout flavor without the mystery additives: This Whole30 recipe recreates a comfort food classic with clean ingredients like fresh ginger, steak, and broccoli. Stay more Bulletproof and use grass-fed beef, arrowroot starch, coconut aminos, and coconut oil to cook. Plus, avoid enjoying black pepper and garlic too often, and consider steaming broccoli instead of stir frying.

^ Hou JK, Lee D, Lewis J (October 2014). "Diet and inflammatory bowel disease: review of patient-targeted recommendations". Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Review). 12 (10): 1592–600. doi:10.1016/j.cgh.2013.09.063. PMC 4021001. PMID 24107394. Even less evidence exists for the efficacy of the SCD, FODMAP, or Paleo diets. Furthermore, the practicality of maintaining these interventions over long periods of time is doubtful.

I’m not going to say I didn’t have some pretty difficult moments. For example, don’t purchase an ice cream maker the day you start your Whole30 and let it sit in your entryway for 30 days to taunt you. I did that; it was dumb. Also, there were points in the program on those days when I felt off that I broke down or wanted to throw in the towel. Feeling bad on top of the normal Lyme symptoms wasn’t great, but I’m glad that I stuck it out.

The biggest downside of this diet is how restrictive it is. A month is a pretty long stretch to make it without taking bite of quinoa, popping a chickpea, or sneaking a sip of wine (especially if you’re a busy, social person), and the protocol does not allow for even the smallest of slip-ups. From the manual: “One bite of pizza, one spoonful of ice cream, one lick of the spoon mixing the batter within the 30-day period and you’ve broken the “reset” button, requiring you to start over again on Day 1.” (Yikes!)

'So here I am. I signed up, and for the first time I’ve enjoyed the open. I competed with members of our CrossFit Type 44 community last Friday. .. I Sat and smiled from my rower thinking so this is why people do it. It was quite a difference, I wasn’t yelling from the ground, puking, or so concerned about my score with other top athletes, I simply enjoyed what my body can do still with minimal training. & for once just felt happy/proud of my effort....& well I beat clint so that was fun. 💃🏼 This week I got to test a past workout, one from my first year I qualified for the games.... & who would of guessed. The girl who trains 4-5x a week mainly lifting, about 90 min a day max beat my old score of the crazy competitive girl who trained 6-7x a week 2-4 hours a day and had no chill. I don’t train TTB much unless it’s strict, but I do lift more. I’m stronger, and I’m in a great balance with life. It’s probably the most proud I’ve been of how far mentally and physically I’ve come. I smiled during my workout not yell. I felt confident in what I could do, and I did it. I had some of my members cheering me on & I loved it.
As paleo guru Robb Wolf puts it, think of a 100-yard football field. The first 99.5 yards are how long Homo-Sapiens spent as hunter-gatherers. As they became REALLY good at hunting and gathering our bodies adapted to that lifestyle over thousands of years. That last half-yard represents our species after the agricultural revolution, where our diet has shifted (but our genetics haven’t).

This does require effort. Grocery shopping, meal planning, dining out, explaining the program to friends and family, and dealing with stress will all prove challenging at some point during your program. We’ve given you a huge number of tools, advice, and resources, but take responsibility for your own plan. Improved health, fitness, and quality of life doesn’t happen automatically just because you’re now taking a pass on bread.
Trying to devise an ideal diet by studying contemporary hunter-gatherers is difficult because of the great disparities that exist; for example, the animal-derived calorie percentage ranges from 25% for the Gwi people of southern Africa to 99% for the Alaskan Nunamiut.[39] Descendants of populations with different diets have different genetic adaptations to those diets, such as the ability to digest sugars from starchy foods.[39] Modern hunter-gatherers tend to exercise considerably more than modern office workers, protecting them from heart disease and diabetes, though highly processed modern foods also contribute to diabetes when those populations move into cities.[39]
The Paleo diet, also referred to as the caveman or Stone-Age diet, includes lean meats, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts, and seeds. Proponents of the diet emphasize choosing low-glycemic fruits and vegetables. There is debate about several aspects of the Paleo diet: what foods actually existed at the time, the variation in diets depending on region (e.g., tropical vs. Arctic), how modern-day fruits and vegetables bear little resemblance to prehistoric wild versions, and disagreement among Paleo diet enthusiasts on what is included/excluded from the diet. Because of these differences, there is not one “true” Paleo diet.
Eat generous amounts of saturated fats like coconut oil and butter or clarified butter. Beef tallow, lard and duck fat are also good, but only if they come from healthy and well-treated animals. Beef or lamb tallow is a better choice than lamb or duck fat. Olive, avocado and macadamia oil are also good fats to use in salads and to drizzle over food, but not for cooking. For more information, have a look at our beginner’s guide to Paleo and fat.
It should be noted that U.S. News & World Report just released its annual ranking of diets, and Whole30 ranked dead last. Why? Essentially, the expert panel of over 20 registered dietitians, academics, and medical doctors found the program unsustainable and potentially unhealthy, since, among other issues, it restricts certain food groups and is high in sodium and cholesterol. But, Whole30's co-creator Melissa Hartwig stands behind the program, telling Cosmopolitan.com that its animal protein recommendations are in line with government recommendations, and that there are no nutrients in temporarily restricted foods, like grains and legumes, that you can't find in fruits and vegetables.
Food and Western Disease: Health and nutrition from an evolutionary perspective by Staffan Lindeberg (MD at Lund University in Sweden) is the newest book promoting the paleo diet. It covers the link between diet and disease in the Western world (all major diseases, including cancer, heart disease, obesity, stroke and dementia) and towards a greater knowledge of what can be defined as the optimal human diet. Benefits and risks are detailed. The Amazon reviews are all 5 stars. Especially read Susan Schenck's detailed review. You can read a preview at Google Books
Why so strict? According to the diet's founders, Melissa and Dallas Hartwig, these are the foods that are most likely to cause inflammation and gut damage. They're also the foods that the founders say destabilize blood sugar levels and lead to cravings. But it's hard to say whether that's true for everyone. In general, limiting sugar and alcohol is always a good idea. But dairy, grains, and legumes? They don't trigger an inflammatory response in everyone, Haas says.

There are about half a dozen diets that are very similar. They all recommend you eat "meat and veg" The reason Whole 30 works for me is because you can have potatoes and fruit. An example of a whole 30 meal would be: 2 pork chops, mashed potatoes made with chicken stock, green beans, finish with your choice of fruit. My favorite is a few grapes or pineapple chunks. Also the goal it to make it 30 days without cheating. There have been several times I would think: OK I can't cheat now I only have __ more days to go. Having an end in site helped me. When I started adding back in food groups after the 30 days. I figured out that I do not do well with Dairy. Now the only dairy I use is real butter. I never thought I could live without cheese... But now I don't think it's a good idea for me. So it helps you figure out what you can and can not eat and still feel good.
BOXROX – Competitive Fitness Magazine is the world's most widely reaching magazine for Crossfitters and fans of functional fitness. With 730.000 monthly readers from more than 180 countries it connects the worldwide fitness community. The magazine and its 200+ active contributors currently cover many topics including CrossFit®, weightlifting, nutrition, lifestyle and community related news. Everything that a fitness fan is searching for.
Eat WELL Feel GOOD: Practical Paleo Living by Diane Frampton has over 200 recipes that makes paleo eating simple, delicious, and ultimately, intuitive. So they claim. There are only a few reviews at Amazon. They all like the book, but their lack of details makes it appear that they are not truly independent reviews. The recipes have a Crossfit appeal to them. Chef Rachel Albert has made some of the recipes and posted here [archive.org].
The data for Cordain's book only came from six contemporary hunter-gatherer groups, mainly living in marginal habitats.[36] One of the studies was on the !Kung, whose diet was recorded for a single month, and one was on the Inuit.[36][37][38] Due to these limitations, the book has been criticized as painting an incomplete picture of the diets of Paleolithic humans.[36] It has been noted that the rationale for the diet does not adequately account for the fact that, due to the pressures of artificial selection, most modern domesticated plants and animals differ drastically from their Paleolithic ancestors; likewise, their nutritional profiles are very different from their ancient counterparts. For example, wild almonds produce potentially fatal levels of cyanide, but this trait has been bred out of domesticated varieties using artificial selection. Many vegetables, such as broccoli, did not exist in the Paleolithic period; broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and kale are modern cultivars of the ancient species Brassica oleracea.[28]
Anything that comes in a box, jar, or bag should be avoided on the paleo diet—as should anything that just wasn't consumed back then. That means no grains, dairy, added salt, or legumes (including peanuts, beans, lentils, and soybeans), according to Robb Wolf, a former research biochemist, paleo expert, and author of The Paleo Solution. While potatoes are generally outlawed on the diet, Wolff says they are okay to eat sparingly as long as you earn them through exercise (more on that next). Alcohol and honey are also generally considered paleo no-nos, but red wine tends to be the closest option there is to a paleo drink, and honey is far preferred to table sugar or artificial sweeteners.
The good news is that you'll find yourself craving your junky favorites less as time goes on. But that first week can be notoriously tough as your body transitions to a cleaner way of eating. Now more than ever, make sure you're eating regular, balanced meals and keeping approved snacks like plantain chips with salsa and celery sticks with almond butter on hand. It's always easier to say no to cookies or chips when you're satisfied from eating something clean and delicious—or have another snack or dish to look forward to.
Cordain explains that high intake of fruits and vegetables is one of best ways to reduce chances of cancer and heart disease. He notes that protein has twice the calorie burning effect of fat and carbs and is more satiating than both. He explains that starch, fats, sugars, and salts together cause us to keep eating. So if we limit our diet to fruits and vegetables and/or meat, we’ll stop eating when we’re full. And if you stop eating when you’re full, you’ll lose weight and won’t get fat. And as you lose weight, your cholesterol will improve (regardless of what you eat). This all makes sense and can’t really be disputed. If you want to lose weight, the Paleo diet will get you there and probably quickly. But Cordain’s hypothesis applied to long-term health falls short.
I’m not going to say I didn’t have some pretty difficult moments. For example, don’t purchase an ice cream maker the day you start your Whole30 and let it sit in your entryway for 30 days to taunt you. I did that; it was dumb. Also, there were points in the program on those days when I felt off that I broke down or wanted to throw in the towel. Feeling bad on top of the normal Lyme symptoms wasn’t great, but I’m glad that I stuck it out.
Buried in the middle of The Revised Metabolic Oncolytic Regimen for Effecting Lysis in Solid Tumors one can find their diet recommendations for tumor control. It has a paleo diet orientation. Protein is 35%, preferably Omega 3 rich. Carbohydrates (also 35%) are only vegetables and fruit, no beans, bread, potatoes, or any grain. Then dietary and supplemental forms of fat should provide 20-30% of (daily) calories.

This list is going to be a little longer than the last. You cut out all sugar (both real and all substitutes whether natural or artificial, like honey, maple syrup, Splenda, etc.). No grains, legumes (including all forms of soy), dairy, or alcohol. You’re also told to avoid additives like MSG and carrageenan, although that should happen naturally if you’re sticking to whole foods.
Participation and sponsorship have grown rapidly since the inception of the Games. The prize money awarded to each first-place male and female increased from $500 at the inaugural Games to $300,000 for 2019.[20] The largest jump in prize money came from the first Games sponsored by Reebok in 2011 when first place went from $25,000 in 2010 to $250,000 in 2011.[21] The total prize payout in 2016 was $2,200,000.[22]
Do not consume baked goods, junk foods, or treats with “approved” ingredients. Recreating or buying sweets, treats, and foods-with-no-brakes (even if the ingredients are technically compliant) is totally missing the point of the Whole30, and will compromise your life-changing results. These are the same foods that got you into health-trouble in the first place—and a pancake is still a pancake, even if it’s made with coconut flour.
Absolutely. In fact, I’m doing it again right now as a way to reset into the New Year. It gets easier the second time around, actually. I already know how to meal prep, and have an arsenal of recipes that I created from the first go-around to guide me through. I kinda miss cheese and chocolate (because, yum), but I’m excited to push that glorious reset button.
In William Calvin's The Ascent of Mind, Chapter 8 he discusses why he thinks that the Acheulian hand-ax (the oldest of the fancy stone tools of Homo erectus) was really a "killer frisbee." He argues that natural selection for throwing accuracy, which requires brain machinery, is the evolutionary scenario for bootstrapping higher intellectual functions. There are many more articles about evolution and human development throughout William's extensive site, though much of it these days is on climate change.
Healthy, delicious, and simple, the Paleo Diet is the diet you were designed to eat. If you want to lose weight—up to seventy-five pounds in six months—or if you want to attain optimal health, The Paleo Diet will change your life now. Dr. Loren Cordain, the world's leading expert on Paleolithic nutrition, demonstrates how by eating all the lean meats and fish, fresh fruits, and nonstarchy vegetables you want, you can lose weight and prevent and treat heart disease, cancer, osteoporosis, metabolic syndrome, and many other illnesses. Incorporating all the latest breakthroughs in Paleo nutrition research, this new edition of the bestselling The Paleo Diet includes six weeks of meal plans to get you started on the Paleo path to weight loss, weight control, increased energy, and lifelong health.
%7B%22ajaxCall%22%3Afalse%2C%22environment%22%3A%22production%22%2C%22production%22%3Atrue%2C%22is_mobile%22%3A%22%22%2C%22date%22%3A%22060319%22%2C%22localeCountry%22%3A%22us%22%2C%22session_id%22%3A%228cC3zrP1nGGZgurL09k89CtiDgh0cx8iJDM%3D%22%2C%22innerCall%22%3Afalse%2C%22page_type%22%3A%22plp%22%2C%22analytics%22%3A%7B%22tags%22%3A%5B%7B%22event%22%3A%22ready%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22pageview%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22plp%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22page_type%22%3A%22PLP%22%2C%22event_category%22%3Anull%2C%22filter_outlet%22%3Anull%2C%22filter_gender%22%3Anull%2C%22filter_category%22%3Anull%2C%22filter_sport%22%3Anull%2C%22filter_brand%22%3Anull%2C%22filter_collection%22%3Anull%2C%22filters_applied*%22%3Anull%2C%22list_type%22%3A%22GRID%22%2C%22price_high%22%3Anull%2C%22price_low%22%3Anull%2C%22product_model_id*%22%3A%22%24products.model%22%2C%22filter_sale%22%3Anull%2C%22product_id*%22%3A%22%24products.id%22%2C%22product_sku*%22%3A%22%24products.sku%22%2C%22product_name*%22%3A%22%24products.name%22%2C%22sort_applied%22%3Anull%2C%22results_page%22%3Anull%2C%22total_results%22%3Anull%2C%22plp_banner%22%3Anull%2C%22plp_wallpaper%22%3Anull%2C%22plp_promo%22%3Anull%2C%22event_name%22%3Anull%2C%22current_filter%22%3Anull%2C%22current_action%22%3Anull%2C%22numerical_category%22%3Anull%2C%22product_colorways*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22cart_id%22%3A%2288b430f41a90a040645f3f4e1e%22%2C%22dw_version%22%3A%22%24dw_version%22%2C%22geo_country%22%3A%22%24cookies.geo_country%22%2C%22environment%22%3Anull%2C%22site_name%22%3Anull%2C%22country%22%3Anull%2C%22language%22%3Anull%2C%22is_mobile%22%3Anull%2C%22page_name%22%3Anull%2C%22is_customizable%22%3Anull%2C%22breadcrumb*%22%3A%22%24breadcrumbs%22%2C%22date%22%3Anull%2C%22logged_in%22%3Anull%2C%22customer_id%22%3A%22%24cookies.customer_id%22%2C%22euci%22%3A%22%24cookies.euci%22%2C%22form_name*%22%3Anull%2C%22form_error*%22%3Anull%2C%22form_field_value*%22%3Anull%2C%22dw_test_id%22%3Anull%2C%22dw_segment_id%22%3Anull%2C%22certona_recs_scheme%22%3Anull%2C%22certona_recs_count%22%3Anull%2C%22certona_recs_query%22%3Anull%2C%22session_id%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22tile-event%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22link%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22tile-event%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event%22%3A%22ELEMENT%22%2C%22event_category%22%3A%22REPLACE%22%2C%22event_name%22%3A%22REPLACE%22%2C%22is_mobile%22%3Anull%2C%22new_product_id*%22%3Anull%2C%22product_color*%22%3A%22%24tile.color%22%2C%22product_colorways*%22%3A%22%24tile.colors%22%2C%22product_group*%22%3A%22inline%22%2C%22product_id*%22%3A%22%24tile.article%22%2C%22product_model_id*%22%3A%22%24tile.model_id%22%2C%22product_name*%22%3A%22%24tile.name%22%2C%22product_personalization*%22%3A%22NO%22%2C%22product_price*%22%3A%22%24tile.price%22%2C%22product_price_type*%22%3A%22%24tile.price_type%22%2C%22product_price_book*%22%3A%22%24tile.pricebook%22%2C%22product_price_vat*%22%3A%22%24tile.price_vat%22%2C%22product_quantity*%22%3A1%2C%22product_rating*%22%3A%22%24tile.rating%22%2C%22product_reviews*%22%3A%22%24tile.reviews%22%2C%22product_category*%22%3A%22%24tile.category%22%2C%22product_gender*%22%3A%22%24tile.gender%22%2C%22product_brand*%22%3A%22%24tile.brand%22%2C%22product_type*%22%3A%22%24tile.type%22%2C%22product_size*%22%3A%22%24tile.size%22%2C%22product_sizes*%22%3A%22%24tile.sizes%22%2C%22product_sku*%22%3A%22%24tile.sku%22%2C%22product_status*%22%3A%22%24tile.status%22%2C%22product_video*%22%3A%22%24tile.video%22%2C%22product_sport*%22%3A%22%24tile.sport%22%2C%22link_name%22%3Anull%2C%22link_href%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22plp-sortbutton%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22link%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22plp-sortbutton%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_category%22%3A%22%24page_type%22%2C%22event_name%22%3A%22%7B0%7D%22%2C%22event%22%3A%22LINK%22%2C%22link_name%22%3Anull%2C%22link_href%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22plp-filterbutton%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22link%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22plp-filterbutton%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_category%22%3A%22%24page_type%22%2C%22event_name%22%3A%22%7B0%7D%22%2C%22event%22%3A%22LINK%22%2C%22link_name%22%3Anull%2C%22link_href%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22plp-sortbutton%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22link%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22plp-sortbutton%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_category%22%3A%22%24page_type%22%2C%22event_name%22%3A%22%7B0%7D%22%2C%22event%22%3A%22LINK%22%2C%22link_name%22%3Anull%2C%22link_href%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22plp-filterbutton%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22link%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22plp-filterbutton%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_category%22%3A%22%24page_type%22%2C%22event_name%22%3A%22%7B0%7D%22%2C%22event%22%3A%22LINK%22%2C%22link_name%22%3Anull%2C%22link_href%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22product-quickview%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22link%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22product-quickview%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_category%22%3A%22PDP%3A%20QUICK%20VIEW%22%2C%22link_name%22%3A%22%7B0%7D%22%2C%22link_href%22%3A%22%7B1%7D%22%2C%22event%22%3A%22LINK%22%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22wishlistadd%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22element%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22wishlistadd%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_name%22%3A%22ADD%20TO%20WISHLIST%22%2C%22event_category%22%3A%22%24page_type%22%2C%22product_id*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_model_id*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_name*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_price*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_price_vat*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_gender*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_category*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22event%22%3A%22ELEMENT%22%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22wishlistremove%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22element%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22wishlistremove%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_name%22%3A%22REMOVE%20FROM%20WISHLIST%22%2C%22event_category%22%3A%22%24page_type%22%2C%22product_id*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_model_id*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_name*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_price*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_price_vat*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_gender*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_category*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_quantity*%22%3A1%2C%22event%22%3A%22ELEMENT%22%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22header-signup%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22element%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22header-signup%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_category%22%3A%22EMAIL%20SIGNUP%22%2C%22customer_email%22%3A%22%24cookies.customer_email%22%2C%22customer_encrypted_email%22%3A%22%24cookies.customer_encrypted_email%22%2C%22signup_location%22%3A%22HEADER%22%2C%22signup_step%22%3A%22%7B0%7D%22%2C%22event%22%3A%22ELEMENT%22%2C%22event_name%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22video-action%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22element%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22video-action%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22video_category%22%3Anull%2C%22video_event%22%3Anull%2C%22video_length%22%3Anull%2C%22video_name%22%3Anull%2C%22video_player%22%3Anull%2C%22video_position%22%3Anull%2C%22event%22%3A%22ELEMENT%22%2C%22event_name%22%3Anull%2C%22event_category%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22email-optout%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22element%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22email-optout%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_category%22%3A%22EMAIL%20OPT-OUT%22%2C%22signup_location%22%3A%22OVERLAY%22%2C%22signup_step%22%3A%22%7B0%7D%22%2C%22event%22%3A%22ELEMENT%22%2C%22event_name%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22social-share%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22element%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22social-share%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event%22%3A%22ELEMENT%22%2C%22event_name%22%3Anull%2C%22event_category%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22form-error%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22element%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22form-error%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_category%22%3A%22FORM%20ERRORS%22%2C%22form_name%22%3A%22%7B0%7D%22%2C%22form_error%22%3A%22%7B1%7D%22%2C%22form_field_value%22%3A%22%7B2%7D%22%2C%22event%22%3A%22ELEMENT%22%2C%22event_name%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22navigation-click%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22link%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22navigation-click%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_category%22%3A%22NAVIGATION%20CLICK%22%2C%22link_name%22%3A%22%7B0%7D%22%2C%22link_href%22%3A%22%7B1%7D%22%2C%22event%22%3A%22LINK%22%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22search-suggestion%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22element%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22search-suggestion%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_name%22%3A%22SEARCH%20SUGGESTION%22%2C%22event_category%22%3A%22SEARCH%22%2C%22form_field_value%22%3Anull%2C%22event%22%3A%22ELEMENT%22%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22generic%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22pageview%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22generic%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22page_name%22%3Anull%2C%22page_type%22%3A%22CUSTOMER%20SERVICE%22%2C%22cart_id%22%3A%2288b430f41a90a040645f3f4e1e%22%7D%7D%5D%2C%22tealium_library%22%3A%22https%3A%2F%2Ftags.tiqcdn.com%2Futag%2Fadidas%2Freebokglobal%2Fprod%2Futag.js%22%2C%22tealium_sync_library%22%3A%22https%3A%2F%2Ftags.tiqcdn.com%2Futag%2Fadidas%2Freebokglobal%2Fprod%2Futag.sync.js%22%7D%2C%22config%22%3A%7B%22replace%22%3A%5B%22filters_applied*%22%2C%22product_id%22%2C%22product_sku%22%2C%22product_name%22%2C%22**%22%5D%7D%2C%22site_name%22%3A%22Reebok%22%2C%22country%22%3A%22US%22%2C%22language%22%3A%22en%22%2C%22profile%22%3A%22reebokglobal%22%2C%22is_customizable%22%3A%22%22%2C%22logged_in%22%3A%22%22%2C%22numerical_category%22%3A9000000%2C%22total_results%22%3A169%2C%22results_page%22%3A1%2C%22dw_version%22%3A%222019w9_13%22%2C%22session%22%3A%7B%7D%2C%22_MAX_DEPTH_LEVEL%22%3A3%2C%22_MAX_OBJECT_PROPS%22%3A10%2C%22events%22%3A%5B%5D%7D
That being said, I wasn't surprised to see Whole30 on the naughty list last year. In case you're not familiar with the program, you cut out all processed foods, grains, legumes, soy and dairy (that includes sugar and alcohol) for 30 days. You're left with meats, seafood, fruits, vegetables, nut butters and nut milks (as long as there's no added sugar — read your labels).

If you've been on the Whole30 and counting down the days until February 1st, step away from the cheese! Before you transition back to your normal diet, here are five solid lessons that I learned from the eating plan that I stuck with even after the 30 days were up. Not only did following them beyond the 30 days prevent me from rebounding back to my higher weight, but they also help keep me on the straight and narrow the rest of the year when I’m not following the program.
“After recently moving to a new city, CrossFit has been by far the easiest place to meet people and make connections,” adds Jeff Lecky, a 39-year-old in finance and analytics from New Brunswick, Canada. “You’re surrounded by like-minded individuals with a passion for fitness and self-improvement, who typically have a similar lifestyle focused around health and fitness.”
×