As of November 1, 2018, the sanctioned events for the 2019 CrossFit Games are in chronological order: Dubai CrossFit Championship (Dubai), Wodapalooza (Miami), Australian CrossFit Championship (Broadbeach), CrossFit Fittest in Cape Town, CrossFit Strength in Depth (London), CrossFit French Throwdown (Paris), Asia CrossFit Championship (Shanghai), Mid-Atlantic CrossFit Challenge (Baltimore), CrossFit Italian Showdown (Milan), Brazil CrossFit Championship (São Paulo), CrossFit Lowlands Throwdown (Apeldoorn), Down Under CrossFit Championship (Wollongong), Reykjavik CrossFit Championship (Reykjavik), Rogue Invitational (Columbus, Ohio), and the Granite Games (St. Cloud, Minnesota).[19][23][24][25][26]

It was in Glassman's own divorce case, though, that the CrossFit defense arsenal launched its full firepower. Lauren and Greg's marriage hit the rocks in 2009. Lauren became pregnant with twins and could no longer travel to the seminars.Greg, wrapped up with CrossFit, became more and more distant. Rumors of infidelity swirled. Soon the two were living in separate houses. In March 2010, Lauren officially filed for divorce. But the case didn't come to a head until July 2012, when Lauren filed a motion to sell her 50 percent stake in the company to Anthos Capital, a Menlo Park, California-based venture capital firm, for $20 million. Glassman, and in short order CrossFit, hit the ceiling.


The Garden of Eating: A Produce-Dominated Diet & Cookbook by Rachel Albert-Matesz and Don Matesz presents evidence for a diet of vegetables, fruits, and pasture-fed animal products. Provides a practical plan and 250 delicious, family-friendly, grain- and dairy-free recipes. Buy from the author's page The Garden of Eating. Rachel's blog The Healthy Cooking Coach. The cookbook maintains a perfect rating at Amazon.
The aspects of the Paleo diet that advise eating fewer processed foods and less sugar and salt are consistent with mainstream advice about diet.[1] Diets with a paleo nutrition pattern have some similarities to traditional ethnic diets such as the Mediterranean diet that have been found to be healthier than the Western diet.[3][6] Following the Paleo diet, however, can lead to nutritional deficiencies such as those of vitamin D and calcium, which in turn could lead to compromised bone health;[1][20] it can also lead to an increased risk of ingesting toxins from high fish consumption.[3]

The Paleo diet not only misunderstands how our own species, the organisms inside our bodies and the animals and plants we eat have evolved over the last 10,000 years, it also ignores much of the evidence about our ancestors' health during their—often brief—individual life spans (even if a minority of our Paleo ancestors made it into their 40s or beyond, many children likely died before age 15). In contrast to Grok, neither Paleo hunter–gatherers nor our more recent predecessors were sculpted Adonises immune to all disease. A recent study in The Lancet looked for signs of atherosclerosis—arteries clogged with cholesterol and fats—in more than one hundred ancient mummies from societies of farmers, foragers and hunter–gatherers around the world, including Egypt, Peru, the southwestern U.S and the Aleutian Islands. "A common assumption is that atherosclerosis is predominately lifestyle-related, and that if modern human beings could emulate preindustrial or even preagricultural lifestyles, that atherosclerosis, or least its clinical manifestations, would be avoided," the researchers wrote. But they found evidence of probable or definite atherosclerosis in 47 of 137 mummies from each of the different geographical regions. And even if heart disease, cancer, obesity and diabetes were not as common among our predecessors, they still faced numerous threats to their health that modern sanitation and medicine have rendered negligible for people in industrialized nations, such as infestations of parasites and certain lethal bacterial and viral infections.
Do not step on the scale or take any body measurements for 30 days. The Whole30 is about so much more than weight loss, and to focus only on body composition means you’ll overlook all of the other dramatic, lifelong benefits this plan has to offer. So, no weighing yourself, analyzing body fat, or taking comparative measurements during your Whole30. (We do encourage you to weigh yourself before and after, so you can see one of the more tangible results of your efforts when your program is over.)

Paleo Comfort Foods: Homestyle Cooking in a Gluten-Free Kitchen by Julie Sullivan Mayfield and Charles Mayfield. Implementing paleo guidelines and principles in this book (no grains, no gluten, no legumes, no dairy), the Mayfields give you 100+ recipes and full color photos with entertaining stories throughout. The recipes in Paleo Comfort Foods can help individuals and families alike lose weight, eat healthy and achieve optimum fitness, making this way of eating sustainable, tasty and fun. The many reviews at Amazon are basically flawless. The sole complaint is over the lack of nutritional information. But there is no counting on the paleo diet and its inclusion would have been inappropriate. Published September 10, 2011.
Cordain explains that high intake of fruits and vegetables is one of best ways to reduce chances of cancer and heart disease. He notes that protein has twice the calorie burning effect of fat and carbs and is more satiating than both. He explains that starch, fats, sugars, and salts together cause us to keep eating. So if we limit our diet to fruits and vegetables and/or meat, we’ll stop eating when we’re full. And if you stop eating when you’re full, you’ll lose weight and won’t get fat. And as you lose weight, your cholesterol will improve (regardless of what you eat). This all makes sense and can’t really be disputed. If you want to lose weight, the Paleo diet will get you there and probably quickly. But Cordain’s hypothesis applied to long-term health falls short.

Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health by Gary Taubes expounds on his 2002 article in the NY Times (What if It's All Been a Big Fat Lie?) and then in Science Magazine (see below). He shows how public health data has been misinterpreted to mark dietary fat and cholesterol as the primary causes of coronary heart disease. Deeper examination, he says, shows that heart disease and other diseases of civilization appear to result from increased consumption of refined carbohydrates: sugar, white flour and white rice. Or in other words, without using the word Paleolithic, he justifies the paleo diet. Here is an excellent chapter by chapter summary of the book [archive.org].
The groundbreaking Whole30 program has helped countless people transform their lives by bringing them better sleep, more energy, fewer cravings, weight loss, and new healthy habits that last a lifetime. In this cookbook, best-selling author and Whole30 co-creator Melissa Hartwig delivers over 150 all-new recipes to help readers prepare delicious, healthy meals during their Whole30 and beyond.

As far as food goes, you’re simply going to eat a lot of fresh, good-quality eats and ditch the processed stuff. Beyond that, you’re removing all grains, dairy, soy, legumes, sugar, artificial sweeteners, and alcohol from your diet. All of these foods (especially in excess), according to the authors, have been linked to systemic inflammation, hormonal imbalance, gut issues, and more. The idea is to remove the stressors from your body and give it the nourishment and time to heal itself it needs. This means less inflammation, a healthy metabolism, hormonal harmony, a happy gut, clearer skin, and improved energy! Sounds good to me. (Although if we’re honest, I panicked a bit when I realized no cheese would hit my lips for a full month.)
In the long term, you have to be sure you’re getting calcium and other nutrients you’re missing by not having dairy products and certain grains. Some paleo-approved foods, such as salmon and spinach, contain calcium, so you have to be sure you’re including them in your diet. It would be a good idea to check with a registered dietitian, too, to make sure you’re meeting your calcium and other nutrient needs.

Since then, I've reintroduced legumes, soy, added sugar, and dairy back into my diet. Since I'm lactose intolerant, I was most afraid of dairy, but it seems as of my dairy intolerance has disappeared, which is an unexpected positive. I definitely sleep worse, though, and feel more bloated when I enjoy dairy or carbs with gluten. So going forward, I'll be eating these with more moderation than before.
One of the most straightforward ways to lose weight is to eat a bit less. Remembering that American portion sizes have ballooned as much as 138% in the past 50 years, cut down on your daily dose of food just a little, and whatever meal plan you choose can be a winner. A cut of chicken should fit in an imaginary deck of cards, and your serving of cheese should be about as big as three stacked dice.

There is little argument over the health benefits of fruits and vegetables. They are chock-full of vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants. The only caveat for paleo dieters is that some vegetables are starchy (e.g., potatoes) and some fruits are higher in sugar (e.g., bananas). So, if you are trying to lose weight or watch your blood sugar levels, eat these in moderation. In fact, potatoes are banned from some versions of the diet.
Advocates of the diet argue that the increase in diseases of affluence after the dawn of agriculture was caused by changes in diet, but others have countered that it may be that pre-agricultural hunter-gatherers did not suffer from the diseases of affluence because they did not live long enough to develop them.[30] Based on the data from hunter-gatherer populations still in existence, it is estimated that at age 15, life expectancy was an additional 39 years, for a total age of 54.[31] At age 45, it is estimated that average life expectancy was an additional 19 years, for a total age of 64 years.[32][33] That is to say, in such societies, most deaths occurred in childhood or young adulthood; thus, the population of elderly – and the prevalence of diseases of affluence – was much reduced. Excessive food energy intake relative to energy expended, rather than the consumption of specific foods, is more likely to underlie the diseases of affluence. "The health concerns of the industrial world, where calorie-packed foods are readily available, stem not from deviations from a specific diet but from an imbalance between the energy humans consume and the energy humans spend."[34]
Upsides: Has cured my chronic acid reflux completely. Completely changed my thyroid function and numbers for the better, have reduced medication dosage. Complexion better than in years. Lost a lot of weight and inches. Has helped to control cravings for many things. Has restored a more stable mental health balance and huge increase in energy levels. Dropping the weight has helped fitness levels immensely. AND if you can afford to buy Nutpods Creamers, these will allow you to drink coffee/tea within reason. This was the biggest bonus ever.
Update: So today is day 18 on my Whole30 journey. I just wanted to let you guys know that there is a lot of cooking involved with this program. I'm actually tired of cooking, which is why I started making large meals to freeze for the week. It actually works out well for me, especially since I don't mind eating the same food everyday. I've also been drinking a lot of tea and water. I feel like it is helping to flush out more toxins from my body. I has been approximately four days since my previous review and I lost an additional 2 pounds on this journey. I have so much energy that I actually am unable to sit still like I used to. I guess I was depressed before going on this journey so the Whole30 has actually improved my mood as well. I go for a walk every day and I've actually started a new workout program!
%7B%22ajaxCall%22%3Afalse%2C%22environment%22%3A%22production%22%2C%22production%22%3Atrue%2C%22is_mobile%22%3A%22%22%2C%22date%22%3A%22070119%22%2C%22localeCountry%22%3A%22us%22%2C%22session_id%22%3A%22P3vfNQkuF6OdZudNCL-pBEeMNhgxaC3xRT4%3D%22%2C%22innerCall%22%3Atrue%2C%22analytics%22%3A%7B%22tags%22%3A%5B%7B%22event%22%3A%22plp-filterapplied%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22element%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22plp-filterapplied%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event%22%3A%22%22%2C%22event_category%22%3A%22PLP%20FILTER%22%2C%22event_name%22%3A%22FILTER%20TOGGLE%3A%20%7B0%7D%7C%7B1%7D%22%7D%7D%5D%7D%2C%22config%22%3A%7B%22replace%22%3A%5B%22filters_applied*%22%2C%22product_id%22%2C%22product_sku%22%2C%22product_name%22%2C%22**%22%5D%7D%2C%22site_name%22%3A%22Reebok%22%2C%22country%22%3A%22US%22%2C%22language%22%3A%22en%22%2C%22profile%22%3A%22reebokglobal%22%2C%22filter_collection%22%3A%22REEBOK%20CROSSFIT%20GAMES%22%2C%22filters_applied*%22%3A%22collection%3AREEBOK%20CROSSFIT%20GAMES%22%2C%22session%22%3A%7B%7D%2C%22_MAX_DEPTH_LEVEL%22%3A3%2C%22_MAX_OBJECT_PROPS%22%3A10%2C%22events%22%3A%5B%5D%7D

Paleo Comfort Foods: Homestyle Cooking in a Gluten-Free Kitchen by Julie Sullivan Mayfield and Charles Mayfield. Implementing paleo guidelines and principles in this book (no grains, no gluten, no legumes, no dairy), the Mayfields give you 100+ recipes and full color photos with entertaining stories throughout. The recipes in Paleo Comfort Foods can help individuals and families alike lose weight, eat healthy and achieve optimum fitness, making this way of eating sustainable, tasty and fun. The many reviews at Amazon are basically flawless. The sole complaint is over the lack of nutritional information. But there is no counting on the paleo diet and its inclusion would have been inappropriate. Published September 10, 2011.
The Whole30 book is the perfect thing to read while you’re visiting your in-laws or don’t feel like telling Aunt Sue for the 100th time what you do for a living. It’s helpful, it’s clear, and it will get you motivated. Want even more Whole30 recipes? Hartwig's latest Whole30 Cookbook may not have the nitty-gritty plan details, but the recipes are baller.

Wheat Belly: Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Path Back to Health by William Davis, MD. A renowned cardiologist explains how eliminating wheat from our diets can prevent fat storage, shrink unsightly "wheat belly" bulges, and reverse myriad health problems, like minor rashes and high blood sugar. The author contends that every single human will experience health improvement by giving up modern wheat. The book provides readers with a user-friendly, step-by-step plan to navigate a new, wheat-free lifestyle. Informed by cutting-edge science and nutrition, along with case studies from men and women who have experienced life-changing transformations in their health after waving goodbye to wheat. The author's blog. Published August 30, 2011.


For most people the fact the Paleo diet delivers the best results is all they need. Improved blood lipids, weight loss, and reduced pain from autoimmunity is proof enough.  Many people however are not satisfied with blindly following any recommendations, be they nutrition or exercise related. Some folks like to know WHY they are doing something. Fortunately, the Paleo diet has stood not only the test of time, but also the rigors of scientific scrutiny.

Thank you for submitting an application to support our event. Due to high demand, we cannot guarantee a spot for each individual who would like to volunteer. Those who are accepted may not be working on the team they requested. You will be notified at least one month prior to the event if you have been selected. We appreciate your continued support of CrossFit and the CrossFit Games.
CN3&trad; combines 3 forms of Creatine into a stimulant-free 3-in-1 Creatine complex! Providing 6.25 total grams consisting of micronized Creatine Monohydrate, Creatine Nitrate, and Creatine Hydrochloride. CN3&trad; is an amazing product to be taken before, during, or after a workout. Looking to amplify Strength & Pumps? CN3&trad; has got you covered!
“Hartwig, a sports nutritionist and cocreator of the Whole30 diet plan, packs her fourth book on the subject with 150 recipes that are, as the cover proclaims in all-caps, “totally compliant.” That means heavy emphasis on eggs, meat, fish, and fresh vegetables, but no grains, dairy, legumes or added sugars. Whether or not one buys into Whole30, there is no denying that Hartwig has come up with a clever array of healthy and flavorful dishes. Highlights include Asian beef zoodle (zucchini noodles) soup, which is similar to Vietnamese pho but uses zucchini noodles, and grilled Jamaican jerk salmon with fresh mango salsa. Many of the recipes come courtesy of guest cooks from various food blogs. For instance, Michelle Smith, from the Whole Smiths blog, contributes cherry-chipotle BBQ chicken thighs, with the fruit providing the sweetness and ground chipotle bringing the heat. Veteran food and cocktail photographer Brent Herrig drives home the point that a burger served on a tomato slice is as delectable as one on a bun, and that meatballs do just fine in a cream sauce made with coconut milk. (Dec.)” —Publishers Weekly
But critics argue that the unlimited amount of red meat the paleo diet allows may have an adverse effect on heart health in people with diabetes, as research links eating red meat in excess to poor heart health. (11)  If you have diabetes and don’t moderate your red-meat intake, this could be a big problem, as people with diabetes are 2 times as likely to die of heart disease as people who do not have diabetes. (12)

Greg Glassman and Lauren Jenai founded CrossFit, Inc. in 2000.[11][12] The company was conceived a few years earlier, in 1996, as Cross-Fit.[13] The original CrossFit gym is in Santa Cruz, California, and the first affiliated gym was CrossFit North in Seattle, Washington; there were 13 by 2005, and today there are more than 13,000.[6] Coaches associated with CrossFit include Louie Simmons, John Welbourn, Bob Harper, and Mike Burgener.[14]
×