Diana Schwarzbein is another M.D. that has come to realize that low carb is what works. See reviews at The Schwarzbein Principle. The book is based on her work with insulin-resistant patients with Type II diabetes. She concludes that low-fat diets cause heart attacks, eating fat makes you lose body fat, and it's important to eat high-cholesterol foods every day.
This does require effort. Grocery shopping, meal planning, dining out, explaining the program to friends and family, and dealing with stress will all prove challenging at some point during your program. We’ve given you a huge number of tools, advice, and resources, but take responsibility for your own plan. Improved health, fitness, and quality of life doesn’t happen automatically just because you’re now taking a pass on bread.

Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health by Gary Taubes expounds on his 2002 article in the NY Times (What if It's All Been a Big Fat Lie?) and then in Science Magazine (see below). He shows how public health data has been misinterpreted to mark dietary fat and cholesterol as the primary causes of coronary heart disease. Deeper examination, he says, shows that heart disease and other diseases of civilization appear to result from increased consumption of refined carbohydrates: sugar, white flour and white rice. Or in other words, without using the word Paleolithic, he justifies the paleo diet. Here is an excellent chapter by chapter summary of the book [archive.org].
Dr. Uffe Ravnskov reviews the ongoing statins debate by comparing his recent publication, “LDL-C does not cause cardiovascular disease,” and the pro-statin claims of the editors of Circulation and the Cholesterol Treatment Trialists’ (CTT) Collaboration. He (along with Drs. Zoë Harcombe and Malcolm Kendrick) notes critical errors and obfuscation in the CTT’s recent Lancet meta-analysis and observes that the published data on coronary mortality, serious adverse events, and statin side effects is misrepresented, not statistically significant, or not provided for further analysis.
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