I can not believe this! Someone recently chewed me out for being unable to afford $25/week for something I need. I’m sorry, but I was born with spina bifida and became permanently disabled at 29, after working since 17! Then, my wonderful caregiver became extremely ill, kept working to afford our lifestyle, but finally his body gave out. Now I’m His caregiver, so our money is overly Tight!

The Paleo diet is the healthiest way you can eat because it is the ONLY nutritional approach that works with your genetics to help you stay lean, strong and energetic! Research in biology, biochemistry, Ophthalmology, Dermatology and many other disciplines indicate it is our modern diet, full of refined foods, trans fats and sugar, that is at the root of degenerative diseases such as obesity, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, depression and infertility. – Robb Wolf
A more traditional minimalist shoe is a moccasin. Footear by Footskins has a line of them. The are available in a variety of soles, e.g. crepe soles (shoe-like with a heal), rubber soles (more flexible), molded soles (thinner and more lightweight but still suitable for outdoors), and leather canoe softsoles (for mostly indoor use). For more see What Are The Main Differences In Your Soles? The moccasin uppers come in a leather choice of deerskin or cowhide. Deerskin is more flexible and is the preferred material to achieve the barefoot equivalent. I bought a pair for around the house as pictured here. I found it cheaper to buy through Amazon.com. See moccasins by New and Bestselling for: Men's and Women's.
Like the Paleo Diet, the Keto Diet is low in carbs. But the primary goal of the Keto Diet is to put your body into a state of ketosis, which is when your body uses fat instead of carbohydrates as its primary energy source. When your body enters ketosis, fat travels to the liver and makes an acid called ketones, which enter your bloodstream and are converted into energy.

The NY Times had a blog article on Good News on Saturated Fat which is reporting on Gary Taubes's interpretation of the new report in The New England Journal of Medicine on a two-year diet experiment in Israel. A followup is the post The Fat Fight Goes On where Gary rebuts the arguments against the study. And here's a good interview with Taubes (and includes a good summary): Gary Taubes on Cold Fusion, Good Nutrition and What Makes Bad (and Good) Science.
But eventually — probably on day 33 — I started to experiment. First came eating ketchup ... no side effect. Next, I had some red wine ... a slight hangover the next day, but nothing like I used to experience when indulging in sugary cocktails. Then, I added gluten ... and my body officially freaked out. I broke out in a rash and hives all over my scalp, neck, and legs which lasted for a few days. I decided to try eating gluten again after the rashes went away to make sure, and sure enough, I woke up the next day to ... more rashes.
A metaresearch group at Tilburg University in the Netherlands investigates scientists’ research methods and operations, scrutinizing questionable practices such as selective reporting of statistical tests and data massaging. The group instead advocates for practices such as preregistering studies and making experimental data immediately available for open external review and verification. Its members are optimistic that “the perverse incentives of careerist academia, to hoard data and sacrifice rigor for headline-generating findings, will ultimately be fixed.”
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