The Paleolithic Prescription: A Program of Diet & Exercise and a Design for Living by S. Boyd Eaton, M.D., Marjorie Shostak and Melvin Konner. This book, published in 1988, was the start of the Paleolithic diet movement. Its recommendations are not in line with what today is considered a paleo diet, as whole grain breads and pastas, legumes and some low fat dairy products are allowed. However, it is still a profoundly important book. Used books are available for a reasonable price.
“Overall competitor seeding at the Games will be determined by athletes' scores in the 2019 worldwide CrossFit Open. Athletes who do not participate in the Open (and thus do not receive an Open score) will receive the lowest seeding and will compete in the first qualifying heats at the 2019 Games. Higher seeded athletes will compete in later heats. Any athlete who qualifies for the Games as a national champion or with a top-twenty placement in the 2019 Open can improve their seeding and possibly qualify for a bye out of the first qualifying elimination round by winning a sanctioned event, regardless of whether that sanctioned event occurs before or after the Open in the 2019 competitive season.”

Glassman has always been a fighter, an us-versus-them kind of guy, and as his company has grown, so has his arsenal: CrossFit now has seven lawyers on staff and at any given time is engaging 12 to 20 outside legal firms to pursue trademark-infringement cases. CrossFit has a database of more than 5,000 possible infringements and is litigating a dozen lawsuits in the U.S. and several more internationally.


“Hartwig, a sports nutritionist and cocreator of the Whole30 diet plan, packs her fourth book on the subject with 150 recipes that are, as the cover proclaims in all-caps, “totally compliant.” That means heavy emphasis on eggs, meat, fish, and fresh vegetables, but no grains, dairy, legumes or added sugars. Whether or not one buys into Whole30, there is no denying that Hartwig has come up with a clever array of healthy and flavorful dishes. Highlights include Asian beef zoodle (zucchini noodles) soup, which is similar to Vietnamese pho but uses zucchini noodles, and grilled Jamaican jerk salmon with fresh mango salsa. Many of the recipes come courtesy of guest cooks from various food blogs. For instance, Michelle Smith, from the Whole Smiths blog, contributes cherry-chipotle BBQ chicken thighs, with the fruit providing the sweetness and ground chipotle bringing the heat. Veteran food and cocktail photographer Brent Herrig drives home the point that a burger served on a tomato slice is as delectable as one on a bun, and that meatballs do just fine in a cream sauce made with coconut milk. (Dec.)” —Publishers Weekly
If you're interested in the paleo plan but don't think you want to be so strict, you don't have to be all-or-nothing with your approach. Consider adopting some eating patterns from paleo and skipping the ones that don't work for you. For example, try just eating more fruits and vegetables and cutting down on added sugars. If you feel unsure about grains or dairy, talk to your doctor or a registered dietitian to determine what's best for your body.
In making the case for meat, Cordain presents anecdotal evidence of Eskimos who lived their full life without a heart attack. The Eskimo diet consists of 97% meat, which he concedes causes all Eskimos to develop atherosclerosis—a common precursor to heart disease. But Cordain says Eskimos never die of heart disease. He discusses one Eskimo who lived 45 years and another who lived 53 years, both without heart disease! He then jumps to the conclusion that because these Eskimos didn’t get heart attacks, even with severe atherosclerosis, meat must have protected them from heart disease. So Cordain’s best case for lots of meat is that you can live to the ripe age of 45 or even 53 without a heart attack. But do people—even unhealthy smokers or the obese—generally get heart attacks before age 53?
Breakfast: My favorite breakfast during this program was leftovers from the night before — it was easy and usually had all the elements I needed to feel full and jumpstart my day. If there was leftover protein, I might throw it over some greens and make a salad. If there was soup, that was always perfect too. When I was feeling breakfast-y, eggs did the trick with some roasted veggies.
If you find that you eat more than you planned at dinner, and don’t have any leftovers, my fallback is always Chicken Salad, tuna salad, egg salad, or a simple green salad. Something simple and you can’t go wrong with any of those. I didn’t include ingredients in the Grocery List for these extras, but maybe something to keep on hand just in case, you know?
There’s been a lot of speculation around how the 2019 Games will pan out with the increased number of participants and elimination rounds. Details remain scarce at this time. The Alliant Energy Center confirmed those dates in an email as accurate. CrossFit HQ also said that is the correct weekend but that the actual start date has not been confirmed yet. Presumably because they’re still working out how the new format will affect timing.

What is the Stone Age or Paleo diet? The Stone Age diet, or paleolithic diet, is based on the foods early humans would have eaten in the Stone Age. It may help in weight loss. Supporters argue that, since our genes have changed little in millions of years, items such as meat, herbs, and insects are more suitable foods for humans than grains and flours. Read now
Eat WELL Feel GOOD: Practical Paleo Living by Diane Frampton has over 200 recipes that makes paleo eating simple, delicious, and ultimately, intuitive. So they claim. There are only a few reviews at Amazon. They all like the book, but their lack of details makes it appear that they are not truly independent reviews. The recipes have a Crossfit appeal to them. Chef Rachel Albert has made some of the recipes and posted here [archive.org].

The Paleolithic Prescription: A Program of Diet & Exercise and a Design for Living by S. Boyd Eaton, M.D., Marjorie Shostak and Melvin Konner. This book, published in 1988, was the start of the Paleolithic diet movement. Its recommendations are not in line with what today is considered a paleo diet, as whole grain breads and pastas, legumes and some low fat dairy products are allowed. However, it is still a profoundly important book. Used books are available for a reasonable price.
Of course Wikipedia has a page on the Paleolithic Diet. It is quite thorough. It also isn't clear about the lean/fatty meat debate between the followers of Loren Cordain and a slew of others, and pushes lean meat. It is weak on the variations of the diet. Then it restricts fermented beverages. Even butterflies eat fermented fruit. Why wouldn't our paleo ancestors also?
Paleo eating requires a lot of planning, prep time, and mental resolve. For instance, eating out on the diet isn't as simple as ordering chicken and a salad. Think: In what oil was the chicken cooked? Did any of the salad toppings come processed, canned, or packaged? "As with every elimination diet, it's just not doable long term," Dr. Ochner says. While weight loss is far from the sole purpose of eating paleo, going on and off of the diet can lead to big weight swings. Any yo-yo diet starts in weight loss from both muscle and fat, and usually ends with weight gain of all fat, which contributes to a slower metabolism and increased insulin resistance.
Prior to starting, athletes should state their name, and show and state the weights and equipment to be used. All video submissions must be uncut and unedited in order to accurately display the performance. A clock or timer, with the running workout time clearly visible should be in the frame throughout the entire workout. Shoot the video from an angle so ALL exercises can be clearly seen meeting the movement standards. Videos shot with a fisheye lens or similar lens may be rejected due to the visual distortion these lenses cause. If an athlete needs someone to adjust their camera during the WOD to capture all movements, this is acceptable, as long as the flow of the workout and the athlete is in view the whole time. It is the athletes responsibility to ensure their video meets the standard.
The Garden of Eating: A Produce-Dominated Diet & Cookbook by Rachel Albert-Matesz and Don Matesz presents evidence for a diet of vegetables, fruits, and pasture-fed animal products. Provides a practical plan and 250 delicious, family-friendly, grain- and dairy-free recipes. Buy from the author's page The Garden of Eating. Rachel's blog The Healthy Cooking Coach. The cookbook maintains a perfect rating at Amazon.
According to Adrienne Rose Johnson, the idea that the primitive diet was superior to current dietary habits dates back to the 1890s with such writers as Dr. Emmet Densmore and Dr. John Harvey Kellogg. Densmore proclaimed that "bread is the staff of death", while Kellogg supported a diet of starchy and grain-based foods.[11] The idea of a Paleolithic diet can be traced to a 1975 book by gastroenterologist Walter Voegtlin,[7]:41 which in 1985 was further developed by Stanley Boyd Eaton and Melvin Konner, and popularized by Loren Cordain in his 2002 book The Paleo Diet.[8] The terms caveman diet and stone-age diet are also used,[12] as is Paleo Diet, trademarked by Cordain.[13]

In 1995, as Glassman was burning the last of his bridges at local gyms, he got a call from a friend who worked at the sheriff's department in Santa Cruz. The department had heard about him and wanted him to train officers. Glassman, who was in the middle of a breakup with a longtime girlfriend, decided to go. He set up shop in a health center called Spa Fitness and taught his own brand of fitness training, which he had begun calling CrossFit, to officers and anyone else looking to buy 60 minutes of sweat.
%7B%22ajaxCall%22%3Afalse%2C%22environment%22%3A%22production%22%2C%22production%22%3Atrue%2C%22is_mobile%22%3A%22%22%2C%22date%22%3A%22290319%22%2C%22localeCountry%22%3A%22us%22%2C%22session_id%22%3A%226mnTO3wgUo4CfGphNAOePqQ42gImXavRXeE%3D%22%2C%22innerCall%22%3Afalse%2C%22page_type%22%3A%22plp%22%2C%22analytics%22%3A%7B%22tags%22%3A%5B%7B%22event%22%3A%22ready%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22pageview%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22plp%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22page_type%22%3A%22PLP%22%2C%22event_category%22%3Anull%2C%22filter_outlet%22%3Anull%2C%22filter_gender%22%3Anull%2C%22filter_category%22%3Anull%2C%22filter_sport%22%3Anull%2C%22filter_brand%22%3Anull%2C%22filter_collection%22%3Anull%2C%22filters_applied*%22%3Anull%2C%22list_type%22%3A%22GRID%22%2C%22price_high%22%3Anull%2C%22price_low%22%3Anull%2C%22product_model_id*%22%3A%22%24products.model%22%2C%22filter_sale%22%3Anull%2C%22product_id*%22%3A%22%24products.id%22%2C%22product_sku*%22%3A%22%24products.sku%22%2C%22product_name*%22%3A%22%24products.name%22%2C%22sort_applied%22%3Anull%2C%22results_page%22%3Anull%2C%22total_results%22%3Anull%2C%22plp_banner%22%3Anull%2C%22plp_wallpaper%22%3Anull%2C%22plp_promo%22%3Anull%2C%22event_name%22%3Anull%2C%22current_filter%22%3Anull%2C%22current_action%22%3Anull%2C%22numerical_category%22%3Anull%2C%22product_colorways*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22cart_id%22%3Anull%2C%22dw_version%22%3A%22%24dw_version%22%2C%22geo_country%22%3A%22%24cookies.geo_country%22%2C%22environment%22%3Anull%2C%22site_name%22%3Anull%2C%22country%22%3Anull%2C%22language%22%3Anull%2C%22is_mobile%22%3Anull%2C%22page_name%22%3Anull%2C%22is_customizable%22%3Anull%2C%22breadcrumb*%22%3A%22%24breadcrumbs%22%2C%22date%22%3Anull%2C%22logged_in%22%3Anull%2C%22customer_id%22%3A%22%24cookies.customer_id%22%2C%22euci%22%3A%22%24cookies.euci%22%2C%22form_name*%22%3Anull%2C%22form_error*%22%3Anull%2C%22form_field_value*%22%3Anull%2C%22dw_test_id%22%3Anull%2C%22dw_segment_id%22%3Anull%2C%22certona_recs_scheme%22%3Anull%2C%22certona_recs_count%22%3Anull%2C%22certona_recs_query%22%3Anull%2C%22session_id%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22tile-event%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22link%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22tile-event%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event%22%3A%22ELEMENT%22%2C%22event_category%22%3A%22REPLACE%22%2C%22event_name%22%3A%22REPLACE%22%2C%22is_mobile%22%3Anull%2C%22new_product_id*%22%3Anull%2C%22product_color*%22%3A%22%24tile.color%22%2C%22product_colorways*%22%3A%22%24tile.colors%22%2C%22product_group*%22%3A%22inline%22%2C%22product_id*%22%3A%22%24tile.article%22%2C%22product_model_id*%22%3A%22%24tile.model_id%22%2C%22product_name*%22%3A%22%24tile.name%22%2C%22product_personalization*%22%3A%22NO%22%2C%22product_price*%22%3A%22%24tile.price%22%2C%22product_price_type*%22%3A%22%24tile.price_type%22%2C%22product_price_book*%22%3A%22%24tile.pricebook%22%2C%22product_price_vat*%22%3A%22%24tile.price_vat%22%2C%22product_quantity*%22%3A1%2C%22product_rating*%22%3A%22%24tile.rating%22%2C%22product_reviews*%22%3A%22%24tile.reviews%22%2C%22product_category*%22%3A%22%24tile.category%22%2C%22product_gender*%22%3A%22%24tile.gender%22%2C%22product_brand*%22%3A%22%24tile.brand%22%2C%22product_type*%22%3A%22%24tile.type%22%2C%22product_size*%22%3A%22%24tile.size%22%2C%22product_sizes*%22%3A%22%24tile.sizes%22%2C%22product_sku*%22%3A%22%24tile.sku%22%2C%22product_status*%22%3A%22%24tile.status%22%2C%22product_video*%22%3A%22%24tile.video%22%2C%22product_sport*%22%3A%22%24tile.sport%22%2C%22link_name%22%3Anull%2C%22link_href%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22plp-sortbutton%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22link%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22plp-sortbutton%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_category%22%3A%22%24page_type%22%2C%22event_name%22%3A%22%7B0%7D%22%2C%22event%22%3A%22LINK%22%2C%22link_name%22%3Anull%2C%22link_href%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22plp-filterbutton%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22link%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22plp-filterbutton%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_category%22%3A%22%24page_type%22%2C%22event_name%22%3A%22%7B0%7D%22%2C%22event%22%3A%22LINK%22%2C%22link_name%22%3Anull%2C%22link_href%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22plp-sortbutton%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22link%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22plp-sortbutton%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_category%22%3A%22%24page_type%22%2C%22event_name%22%3A%22%7B0%7D%22%2C%22event%22%3A%22LINK%22%2C%22link_name%22%3Anull%2C%22link_href%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22plp-filterbutton%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22link%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22plp-filterbutton%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_category%22%3A%22%24page_type%22%2C%22event_name%22%3A%22%7B0%7D%22%2C%22event%22%3A%22LINK%22%2C%22link_name%22%3Anull%2C%22link_href%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22product-quickview%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22link%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22product-quickview%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_category%22%3A%22PDP%3A%20QUICK%20VIEW%22%2C%22link_name%22%3A%22%7B0%7D%22%2C%22link_href%22%3A%22%7B1%7D%22%2C%22event%22%3A%22LINK%22%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22wishlistadd%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22element%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22wishlistadd%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_name%22%3A%22ADD%20TO%20WISHLIST%22%2C%22event_category%22%3A%22%24page_type%22%2C%22product_id*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_model_id*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_name*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_price*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_price_vat*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_gender*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_category*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22event%22%3A%22ELEMENT%22%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22wishlistremove%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22element%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22wishlistremove%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_name%22%3A%22REMOVE%20FROM%20WISHLIST%22%2C%22event_category%22%3A%22%24page_type%22%2C%22product_id*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_model_id*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_name*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_price*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_price_vat*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_gender*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_category*%22%3A%22%22%2C%22product_quantity*%22%3A1%2C%22event%22%3A%22ELEMENT%22%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22header-signup%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22element%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22header-signup%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_category%22%3A%22EMAIL%20SIGNUP%22%2C%22customer_email%22%3A%22%24cookies.customer_email%22%2C%22customer_encrypted_email%22%3A%22%24cookies.customer_encrypted_email%22%2C%22signup_location%22%3A%22HEADER%22%2C%22signup_step%22%3A%22%7B0%7D%22%2C%22event%22%3A%22ELEMENT%22%2C%22event_name%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22video-action%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22element%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22video-action%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22video_category%22%3Anull%2C%22video_event%22%3Anull%2C%22video_length%22%3Anull%2C%22video_name%22%3Anull%2C%22video_player%22%3Anull%2C%22video_position%22%3Anull%2C%22event%22%3A%22ELEMENT%22%2C%22event_name%22%3Anull%2C%22event_category%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22email-optout%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22element%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22email-optout%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_category%22%3A%22EMAIL%20OPT-OUT%22%2C%22signup_location%22%3A%22OVERLAY%22%2C%22signup_step%22%3A%22%7B0%7D%22%2C%22event%22%3A%22ELEMENT%22%2C%22event_name%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22social-share%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22element%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22social-share%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event%22%3A%22ELEMENT%22%2C%22event_name%22%3Anull%2C%22event_category%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22form-error%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22element%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22form-error%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_category%22%3A%22FORM%20ERRORS%22%2C%22form_name%22%3A%22%7B0%7D%22%2C%22form_error%22%3A%22%7B1%7D%22%2C%22form_field_value%22%3A%22%7B2%7D%22%2C%22event%22%3A%22ELEMENT%22%2C%22event_name%22%3Anull%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22navigation-click%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22link%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22navigation-click%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_category%22%3A%22NAVIGATION%20CLICK%22%2C%22link_name%22%3A%22%7B0%7D%22%2C%22link_href%22%3A%22%7B1%7D%22%2C%22event%22%3A%22LINK%22%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22search-suggestion%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22element%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22search-suggestion%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22event_name%22%3A%22SEARCH%20SUGGESTION%22%2C%22event_category%22%3A%22SEARCH%22%2C%22form_field_value%22%3Anull%2C%22event%22%3A%22ELEMENT%22%7D%7D%2C%7B%22event%22%3A%22generic%22%2C%22type%22%3A%22pageview%22%2C%22scheme%22%3A%22generic%22%2C%22attributes%22%3A%7B%22page_name%22%3Anull%2C%22page_type%22%3A%22CUSTOMER%20SERVICE%22%2C%22cart_id%22%3Anull%7D%7D%5D%2C%22tealium_library%22%3A%22https%3A%2F%2Ftags.tiqcdn.com%2Futag%2Fadidas%2Freebokglobal%2Fprod%2Futag.js%22%2C%22tealium_sync_library%22%3A%22https%3A%2F%2Ftags.tiqcdn.com%2Futag%2Fadidas%2Freebokglobal%2Fprod%2Futag.sync.js%22%7D%2C%22config%22%3A%7B%22replace%22%3A%5B%22filters_applied*%22%2C%22product_id%22%2C%22product_sku%22%2C%22product_name%22%2C%22**%22%5D%7D%2C%22site_name%22%3A%22Reebok%22%2C%22country%22%3A%22US%22%2C%22language%22%3A%22en%22%2C%22profile%22%3A%22reebokglobal%22%2C%22is_customizable%22%3A%22%22%2C%22logged_in%22%3A%22%22%2C%22numerical_category%22%3A9000000%2C%22total_results%22%3A167%2C%22results_page%22%3A1%2C%22dw_version%22%3A%222019w13_24%22%2C%22session%22%3A%7B%7D%2C%22_MAX_DEPTH_LEVEL%22%3A3%2C%22_MAX_OBJECT_PROPS%22%3A10%2C%22events%22%3A%5B%5D%7D
"Loren Cordain's extensive research demonstrates how modern westernized diets drastically depart from the original diet humans consumed for millions of years. In The Paleo Diet and The Paleo Diet Cookbook, Dr. Cordain shows how diets high in grains, dairy, vegetable oils, salt, and refined sugars are at odds with our genetic legacy and then shares his uncomplicated strategy for losing weight and getting healthy."
The Raw Paleo Diet & Lifestyle site is a resource created by members of the Raw Paleolithic Diet community for people looking to improve their health by choosing a more historically natural approach to diet, fitness and lifestyle. They have two forums: Raw Paleo Forum. It has some activity. And Raw Paleo Diet, or RVAF Raw Veg and Animal Foods Group, a forum for followers of semi-RPD diets, (such as Aajonus Vonderplanitz's Primal Diet/Weston-Price Diet/Sally Fallon/Instincto) and followers of the NeanderThin/Paleo/Stefansson Diets, who, for health reasons, wish to pursue a more fully Raw, Paleolithic variation of those diets.
If you have been in a state of dependency on food--be it sugars, alcohol, chips, ice cream, just about anything--or if you have been unwell, unsuited to the world physically or emotionally--or, if you simply feel blah and would like to lose a little bit of weight--please consider trying this program. You might think, "I don't eat that badly! I eat a lot of whole foods!" which is what most people think of themselves (I sure did). But when you actually make a conscious decision to eliminate foods from your diet, you will see that even the small amounts of crap that you've been eating regularly matter. Prepare to be amazed. I sound like an evangelical, I know. It's a little embarrassing. But it is all true.
I’m not going to say I didn’t have some pretty difficult moments. For example, don’t purchase an ice cream maker the day you start your Whole30 and let it sit in your entryway for 30 days to taunt you. I did that; it was dumb. Also, there were points in the program on those days when I felt off that I broke down or wanted to throw in the towel. Feeling bad on top of the normal Lyme symptoms wasn’t great, but I’m glad that I stuck it out.

First of all, it’s unclear if it can really live up to its claim to improve overall health by following the diet of our ancestors. While we can all benefit from reducing our intake of processed foods and increasing fruit and vegetable consumption, many dispute whether our ancestors were really all that much healthier than we are today given their significantly shorter life span. In fact, one study even demonstrated that they may have had increased rates of atherosclerosis, or hardened arteries. (5)
All involve eating whole foods (as opposed to packaged and processed) and filling your plate with quality sources of protein, healthy fats, complex carbohydrates, and vitamin-, mineral-, and fiber-rich vegetables. (Again, we’re talking about the ones that fall somewhere on the healthy spectrum, not unhealthy fad diets like, ahem, the Grapefruit Diet.)
My fiancee and I did this together. It takes teamwork (if you have a family, you probably need to get them on board). It also will help if you can begin (or even complete) this diet when you have a minimum of social obligations--having office mates who eat a lot of cake or friends who drink a lot of booze WILL NOT HELP while you are on this program. Don't try to start this the week before Christmas if your family gathers to eat until they pass out. Be realistic about when you begin this. You must prepare a little bit and read the book ahead of time so you aren't just floating at sea. And, be aware: you will not be able to sufficiently screen foods made by other people!
The paleo diet (also nicknamed the caveman diet, primal diet, Stone Age diet, and hunter-gatherer diet) is hugely popular these days, and goes by one simple question: What would a caveman eat? Here, we explain what the paleo diet involves, its pros and cons, and, ultimately, what a modern person needs to know to decide whether or not to take the paleo diet plunge.
I am currently prepping for my second Whole 30. I have 3 kids with the youngest being just about 6 months, so I’m taking the time to plan out the first month as well as the reintro month. I am so pleased that you have another whole 30 plan! I do pick and choose and use my own meal planning software, but it’s such an invaluable resource. Best of all my whole family has loved almost every recipe of your that we have tried! Keep them coming, please!
Looking back on my lifestyle before the Whole30, my personal recipe for making unhealthy food choices typically consisted of being hungry and on a time crunch, which meant I'd choose whatever was most convenient (read: something overly processed from the vending machine). "Whole30 requires you to plan ahead, mainly so you stay 'compliant' and don’t go hungry," explains Liz McMahon, RDN. "Planning out meals and batch cooking ensures you have healthier food available and won’t constantly be reaching for fast food options." Making pre-planning a habit — even when I'm dining out — helps keep me on track even when I'm not following the Whole30.
If you have been in a state of dependency on food--be it sugars, alcohol, chips, ice cream, just about anything--or if you have been unwell, unsuited to the world physically or emotionally--or, if you simply feel blah and would like to lose a little bit of weight--please consider trying this program. You might think, "I don't eat that badly! I eat a lot of whole foods!" which is what most people think of themselves (I sure did). But when you actually make a conscious decision to eliminate foods from your diet, you will see that even the small amounts of crap that you've been eating regularly matter. Prepare to be amazed. I sound like an evangelical, I know. It's a little embarrassing. But it is all true.
On the surface, the Keto diet and the Paleo diet, two of the most popular diets out there, seem pretty similar. Both are low-carb plans that don't allow you to eat some of your favorite foods, such as cookies, pizza, and cereal. But there are actually some pretty important differences between the two diets that you should know, so you can figure out if either of them are right for you.
Autoimmunity is a process in which our bodies own immune system attacks “us.” Normally the immune system protects us from bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections. The immune system identifies a foreign invader, attacks it, and ideally clears the infection. A good analogy for autoimmunity is the case of tissue rejection after organ donation. If someone requires a new heart, lung kidney or liver due to disease or injury, a donor organ may be an option. The first step in this process is trying to find a tissue “match”. All of us have molecules in our tissues that our immune system uses to recognize self from non-self. If a donated organ is not close enough to the recipient in tissue type the immune system will attack and destroy the organ. In autoimmunity, a similar process occurs in that an individuals own tissue is confused as something foreign and the immune system attacks this “mislabeled” tissue. Common forms of autoimmunity include Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, and Vitiligo to name only a tiny fraction of autoimmune diseases. Elements of autoimmunity are likely at play in conditions as seemingly unrelated as Schizophrenia, infertility, and various forms of cancer.
What is the Stone Age or Paleo diet? The Stone Age diet, or paleolithic diet, is based on the foods early humans would have eaten in the Stone Age. It may help in weight loss. Supporters argue that, since our genes have changed little in millions of years, items such as meat, herbs, and insects are more suitable foods for humans than grains and flours. Read now
To deal with this major food rut and disinterest in cooking, I bought my lunch every single day from Dig Inn and begged my boyfriend to take me out to dinner at a restaurant with Whole30–compliant options. As someone who typically brings lunch to work and cooks dinner on weeknights, I knew I was spending way over my normal budget, but I couldn't help myself. It was for my sanity.

You’ll lose weight because any time you restrict entire food groups, your calorie intake tends to be lower, Sandon says. And whenever you burn more calories than you consume, you'll have weight loss, she says. (2) The focus on lean protein, fruits, and vegetables over calorie- and sodium-rich processed foods can also contribute to weight loss, though she also points out that the paleo diet wasn’t created to be a weight loss diet. (3)
The NY Times had a blog article on Good News on Saturated Fat which is reporting on Gary Taubes's interpretation of the new report in The New England Journal of Medicine on a two-year diet experiment in Israel. A followup is the post The Fat Fight Goes On where Gary rebuts the arguments against the study. And here's a good interview with Taubes (and includes a good summary): Gary Taubes on Cold Fusion, Good Nutrition and What Makes Bad (and Good) Science.

The paleo diet is promoted as a way of improving health.[2] There is some evidence that following this diet may lead to improvements in terms of body composition and metabolic effects compared with the typical Western diet[6] or compared with diets recommended by national nutritional guidelines.[9] There is no good evidence that the diet helps with weight loss, other than through the normal mechanisms of calorie restriction.[10] Following the paleo diet can lead to nutritional deficiencies such as an inadequate calcium intake, and side effects can include weakness, diarrhea, and headaches.[3][10]
In 1995, as Glassman was burning the last of his bridges at local gyms, he got a call from a friend who worked at the sheriff's department in Santa Cruz. The department had heard about him and wanted him to train officers. Glassman, who was in the middle of a breakup with a longtime girlfriend, decided to go. He set up shop in a health center called Spa Fitness and taught his own brand of fitness training, which he had begun calling CrossFit, to officers and anyone else looking to buy 60 minutes of sweat.
Before I went on Whole30 I was sleeping 8 to 10 hours a night (yes, I love my sleep), yet come 2 p.m. I'd hit an energy slump. I'd feel high right after I ate (looking back on it, probably because I was eating so much added sugar) but my energy would significantly fluctuate through the day. During the beginning of Whole30 — specifically the first three days — I really struggled. Again, I was a sugar addict and I think detoxing from that really affected my energy levels. But after that slump, my energy was constant — I really had never felt better. Even when things didn't go the way I wanted, I felt energetic and up for any challenge.
Glassman is proud of his role in all this, but the system puts him and CrossFit at a very real risk. As the world of CrossFit grows, as more businesses enter and profit, and his share of it becomes smaller, CrossFit's greatest success--gaining mainstream acceptance as exercise and a sport--could turn it generic, like baseball or skiing. "One of our greatest fears is becoming escalator," says Dale Saran, CrossFit's general counsel, referring to what was once a trademarked name brand of Otis Elevator. So, although Glassman keeps the CrossFit business model radically loose and open, he protects the brand name with an iron fist.
All this said, I still think it's worth buying if you are looking for more variety in your Whole 30 meals. I think the least complicated section is breakfast and lots of them look delicious. However, anticipate that this cookbook may surprise some people who were used to the recipes and format from the 30 Day Guide. This one is definitely more work. I would love to see one like the 30 Day Guide, with more one pot meals, "make it a meal" options, etc...
First, I’d just like to acknowledge that I’m not a nutritionist or a healthcare professional. The opinions I share here are simply my own experiences and thoughts while trying this program. I also acknowledge that the topics of healthy eating, dieting, and illness are very personal, and what might work for me, might not work for someone else. We are all unique.
The paleo diet is promoted as a way of improving health.[2] There is some evidence that following this diet may lead to improvements in terms of body composition and metabolic effects compared with the typical Western diet[6] or compared with diets recommended by national nutritional guidelines.[9] There is no good evidence that the diet helps with weight loss, other than through the normal mechanisms of calorie restriction.[10] Following the paleo diet can lead to nutritional deficiencies such as an inadequate calcium intake, and side effects can include weakness, diarrhea, and headaches.[3][10]
This one was hard for us to grasp, so it deserves some explanation. If a Paleo pancake calls for nothing but Whole30-approved ingredients (eggs and bananas), the flapjack is still off-limits. The Whole30 wants you to change your habits and your emotional relationship with food. "Your brain doesn't know the difference between an almond flour brownie and your mom's recipe; it just knows you crave sugar. So if you keep eating those sweets during the 30 days, your habits aren't changing," Hartwig says. Don't shoot the messenger!
But listen--we'd both been relatively inactive for years and each about 25 pounds overweight. Between the two of us we lost 34 lbs in 30 days and we are still going to keep up a serious commitment to Whole 30, with a few supplemental treats now and then. We feel better, we have new confidence about getting dressed in the morning, and we're more fit than in years, mostly because we have the energy to do more. The amazing thing is that you will NOT feel hungry if you hang in there and consistently prepare foods as per the cookbook/menus. There is also a very supportive and helpful forum online to supplement the book.
What is the Stone Age or Paleo diet? The Stone Age diet, or paleolithic diet, is based on the foods early humans would have eaten in the Stone Age. It may help in weight loss. Supporters argue that, since our genes have changed little in millions of years, items such as meat, herbs, and insects are more suitable foods for humans than grains and flours. Read now
Trying to introduce dairy back into my diet hurt my stomach and would send me into a sneezing fit. In this way, the Whole30 worked as a type of elimination diet for me, without which I may have never realized that dairy isn't my friend. I'll still suffer the consequences if I cross paths with a cheese plate at a work event, but I've made the permanent switch to tofu cream cheese and coconut milk — alternatives I would've never touched before Whole30 that are actually delicious.

A study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition compared the benefits of following a Paleo diet versus a diet recommended by the American Diabetes Association in 24 participants with diabetes. After two weeks, researchers found that the Paleo diet led to greater improvements in blood sugar levels and insulin sensitivity than the conventional diabetes diet. (4)
In the past few decades, our diets have changed dramatically. Processed foods are more common than fruits and vegetables, and it’s impossible to go more than a few miles down the road without spotting a dozen new fast food chains that have cropped up. Enter the Paleo diet plan, a diet that seeks to ditch the modern convenience foods in favor of the foods eaten by our ancestors.
The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living: An Expert Guide to Making the Life-Saving Benefits of Carbohydrate Restriction Sustainable and Enjoyable by Stephen D. Phinney and Jeff S. Volek synthesizes the science into one readable source. The book is excellent for general low-carb high-fat moderate protein diets. While they begin with the idea that we should eat like a caveman, they do not follow the conclusion to its logical end and have us avoid the classes of foods our ancestors would have found unrecognizable. They avoid the metobolic syndrome, but not the autoimmune diseases. They mention that monosaturates should be favored, though they are not emphasized in the menu example. The book's daily menu examples also all include dairy in one form or another. No tips are given tips for those who do not do dairy. Published May 19, 2011. The Amazon reviews average to 4+.
This is a complete list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet. It’s a sad day when you first have to say goodbye to these foods but, once you start, it’s much easier and you find there are even better paleo substitutes for these foods. The first few weeks might be tough, but if you stick with it over time, it’ll be worth it. We promise. Here’s the ultimate list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet.

“Hartwig, a sports nutritionist and cocreator of the Whole30 diet plan, packs her fourth book on the subject with 150 recipes that are, as the cover proclaims in all-caps, “totally compliant.” That means heavy emphasis on eggs, meat, fish, and fresh vegetables, but no grains, dairy, legumes or added sugars. Whether or not one buys into Whole30, there is no denying that Hartwig has come up with a clever array of healthy and flavorful dishes. Highlights include Asian beef zoodle (zucchini noodles) soup, which is similar to Vietnamese pho but uses zucchini noodles, and grilled Jamaican jerk salmon with fresh mango salsa. Many of the recipes come courtesy of guest cooks from various food blogs. For instance, Michelle Smith, from the Whole Smiths blog, contributes cherry-chipotle BBQ chicken thighs, with the fruit providing the sweetness and ground chipotle bringing the heat. Veteran food and cocktail photographer Brent Herrig drives home the point that a burger served on a tomato slice is as delectable as one on a bun, and that meatballs do just fine in a cream sauce made with coconut milk. (Dec.)” —Publishers Weekly
This 2003 CrossFit Journal article captures an early conception of a universal, multi-event test of fitness that laid the foundation for CrossFit competition, including what would become the CrossFit Open and the CrossFit Games. The design requirements for such a test "included but were not limited to the following: quantifiable results; consistency with the CrossFit fitness concept; raising our commitment to improving absolute strength, relative strength, and gymnastic foundations; balancing intrinsic abilities of smaller and larger athletes; emphasizing exercises critical to and foundational to advanced training; mixing training demands within each test and, of course, over the total competition; a design that would identify an athlete’s weaknesses and possibly stand as a workout plan for improving overall fitness; and, finally, we wanted to design a competition that would be 'hard as hell.'"
×