I believe the 2019 open is an epic fail. While I agree, CrossFit is a world wide sport, showcasing athletes from every country the new format leaves me confused and has deflated my motivation to compete this year. Like most professional sports, the media experience drives the interest of the fans for each competition. You don’t see other major sports get rid of their media teams in the hopes of attracting new fans in other countries. Those countries develop their own media teams for content, broadcasting etc. I’ve been a cross fit athlete before it was “cool” and have been a level 1 certified trainer. I looked forward to the open because it brought the “average” athlete into the world only few see. The announcements are weak, in another language and of poor content. Was this really your best option, scrap the entire media staff? Which in turn meant you took away all of usual vidoes, blogs, vlogs, articles etc. we’ve grown accustom to seeing each year. I’m disappointed because you’re better than that, smarter as a brand. Imagine the NFL, MLB, NBA (because that’s where Cross Fit was heading as a brand) get rid of all media content to boost global attention by taking away everything the fans used, looked forward to and relied on for information across each media domain. It’s virtual brand suicide. Just like your affiliates, which pop up at every available garage door….you develop media teams for each nation. You don’t scrap what’s working and alienate your core audience.
For the 2019 CrossFit Games season, there will be 15 events taking place that are being called Sanctionals. These are sanctioned CrossFit competitions that are taking place in multiple countries across the globe. In the 2019 CrossFit Games Rulebook, CrossFit, Inc. states that the Santional events are not connected to the CrossFit Games, although, the male, female, and teams that win the elite division will receive an invite to the Games.
The paleo diet (also nicknamed the caveman diet, primal diet, Stone Age diet, and hunter-gatherer diet) is hugely popular these days, and goes by one simple question: What would a caveman eat? Here, we explain what the paleo diet involves, its pros and cons, and, ultimately, what a modern person needs to know to decide whether or not to take the paleo diet plunge.

At CFIH, we believe that results are rewarded to those who work hard for them. We provide the tools and together we will work to accomplish your goals. We believe that it’s not just our commitment to fitness and clean eating that helps pave the way to success, but also our community which holds all of the key pieces together. Fall in love with our culture and join a community that is filled with individuals who live lives of integrity, who exude a confident but humble demeanor, and who are committed to creating positive habits to last a lifetime! Join us and become a happier, healthier, and more fulfilled YOU!

Thank you so much for your wonderful testimonial! I’m so glad to hear you guys are having such great results. I never really drink anything other than water and kombucha (not even milk, soda, or alcohol) even when I’m not on a Whole30, so that’s all I ever drank. If you are missing milk, you could try making your own almond milk (since the store-bought stuff is hard to find without sugar or carageenan). Other than that, I think it’s probably best to stick with water (maybe even infused with citrus, cucumbers, or fruits).
Deadly Harvest: The Intimate Relationship Between Our Health and Our Food by Geoff Bond. The author is a nutritional anthropologist who has for years investigated both foods of the past and our prehistoric eating habits. Using the latest scientific research and studies of primitive tribal lifestyles, Bond first explains the actual diet that our ancestors followed--a diet that was and still is in harmony with the human species. He then describes how the foods in today's diets disrupt our biochemistry and digestive system, leading to health disorders such as allergies, arthritis, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis, obesity, and more. Most important, he explains the appropriate measures we can take to avoid these diseases--and even beat them back--through healthy eating. The conclusions of Deadly Harvest are that disease control happens by eating a strict low-glycemic diet, lowering the percentage of body fat you carry around, eat a diet consisting of mostly non-starchy plant-based foods, eat a low-fat diet with ample amounts of omega-3 fats, maintain good colon health, engage in regular physical activity, get some daily sunshine, and reduce chronic stress. If you do this, then diseases like cancer, heart disease, digestive problems, allergies, autoimmune diseases, brain diseases, diabetes, and obesity can be avoided. The Amazon reviews average to 5 stars.
My husband and I are about to take a journey on the whole 30 and I was delighted when I came across your website. I have a couple of wonderings: Does all of your recipes strictly follow the whole 30 guidelines? I saw Coconut milk and honey in your chicken curry recipe…I really want to be able to use your recipes and follow the whole 30 the right way.
While founders Dallas Hartwig and Melissa Hartwig are adamant in their book and on their website that “you’ve done harder things than this, and you have no excuse not to complete the program as written,” the Whole30 is not for the lazy or noncommittal. Without careful planning, a strong support system and dogged dedication, a business lunch, flight delay or date night can throw you off and send you back to the start. By nature, diets that eliminate entire food groups are tough to follow. On the other hand, it’s only 30 days.
For the wall-ball, the athlete must start with the ball at a dead stop on the ground. The athlete may then pick up the ball and stand tall before beginning a set, or squat clean the ball, before beginning their first repetition of any set. An athlete may not start in a squat, pick up the ball from this position, and toss the ball to the target. A repetition consists of an athlete holding the ball in the “front rack,” and performing a full squat, hip-crease passing below the top of the knee, and when vertically extending throwing the ball to a specific target height. If the athlete’s hip does not break parallel, or the target does not touch the wall, that rep will not be counted. The athlete may then catch the ball and perform multiple reps if they so choose. Finally, athletes may not catch the ball on the bounce, and head right into a wall-ball repetition. The ball must be settled on the floor before picking it up to begin another set.
What is the Stone Age or Paleo diet? The Stone Age diet, or paleolithic diet, is based on the foods early humans would have eaten in the Stone Age. It may help in weight loss. Supporters argue that, since our genes have changed little in millions of years, items such as meat, herbs, and insects are more suitable foods for humans than grains and flours. Read now
Cordain admits that meat leads to plaque and increases cholesterol where plants wouldn’t. And science establishes that plaque and cholesterol lead to heart attacks and strokes. But Cordain argues that plaque alone is insufficient to cause harm. Rather, it is plaque combined with inflammation that causes heart attacks and strokes. So avoid acid, salt, legumes, wheat, starchy vegetables, dairy, oil, fatty meats, and grains because they cause inflammation. But if both science and Cordain agree that plaque is a necessary part of the heart-disease equation—and that meat causes plaque—why should we follow Paleo rather than just forgo meat?

That's a lot of tension--doing everything possible to make CrossFit a mainstream sport while legally or digitally body slamming anyone who refers to the CrossFit name to cater to its athletes or fans. Glassman has always thrived on doing the opposite of what anyone has ever figured was sensible or possible. But now Glassman's own intentions, of doing what he wants and letting others do what they want, are pressing up against each other more every day. In CrossFit, Glassman is hoisting two massive, contending ideas at once: CrossFit is an open-source workout for everyone to enjoy; CrossFit is a trademarked brand protected as viciously as a Hells Angels jacket. If it comes clattering down, it will be painful as all hell to watch. But if it succeeds? It won't be the first time a CrossFitter shocks people with how much weight he put above his head. You can bet Glassman's gonna try for another rep.


Some specific foods that fall under this rule include: pancakes, waffles, bread, tortillas, biscuits, muffins, cupcakes, cookies, brownies, pizza crust, alternative flour pastas, cereal, or ice cream. No commercially-prepared chips (potato, tortilla, plantain, etc.) or French fries either. However, this list is not limited strictly to these items—there may be other foods that you find are not psychologically healthy for your Whole30. Use your best judgment with those foods that aren’t on this list, but that you suspect are not helping you change your habits or break those cravings. Our mantra: When in doubt, leave it out. It’s only 30 days.
ICYMI: Whole30 is an elimination-style diet that asks dieters to ban all soy, dairy, grains, alcohol, legumes, and added sugars from their diet for 30 days straight. The point is to flush your system, so when the 30 days are up, you can slowly add different food groups back and get a sense of which ones have been secretly affecting your physical and mental health. The creator, Melissa Hartwig, also says Whole30 will change your entire relationship with food.

Both feeling hungry all the time and never feeling hungry are common on the Whole30 diet, especially during the first two weeks as your body adjusts to new sources of energy. Eventually, though, you shouldn’t feel those pangs since protein and fiber are filling, and you’ll get plenty of both. Plus, you’re allowed to eat as much as you want and add Whole30-compliant snacks to your meal plan, provided you truly are hungry. One small study of 29 participants published in Nutrition and Metabolism in 2010 found Paleo eaters (who have relatively similar diets to Whole30 followers) felt just as full but consumed fewer calories than their Mediterranean counterparts.
CrossFit programming is decentralized, but its general methodology is used by thousands of private affiliated gyms, fire departments, law-enforcement agencies, and military organizations, including the Royal Danish Life Guards,[27][28][29][30] as well as by some U.S. and Canadian high-school physical-education teachers, high-school and college sports teams, and the Miami Marlins.[14][31][32]
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