is something you have to experience to truly understand and appreciate. CFHP is a fitness community of committed and focused individuals who are determined, dedicated and constantly setting and achieving new goals. Our brand new state of the art facility has no fancy equipment or machinery; just the basic tools of a true training program that delivers proven, measurable results.
"We settled, because I don't want to spent 50 to 75 grand getting sued," says Jason Janke. "I covered up the sign." Saran, CrossFit's general counsel, says it's all part of the fight against "the road to genericization." If people can sell "CrossFit equipment" the way they sell "baseball equipment," says Saran, then it becomes crossfit. Soon anyone will be able to coach crossfit or promote a crossfit tournament--effectively killing the value of being an official affiliate, or being CrossFit, for that matter.
The "CrossFit Games", directed by Dave Castro, have been held every summer since 2007. Athletes at the Games compete in workouts they learn about only hours beforehand, sometimes including surprise elements that are not part of the typical CrossFit regimen. Past examples include a rough-water swim, a softball throw, and a pegboard climb.[46] The Games are styled as a venue for determining the "Fittest on Earth," where competitors should be "ready for anything."[47]
That's a lot of tension--doing everything possible to make CrossFit a mainstream sport while legally or digitally body slamming anyone who refers to the CrossFit name to cater to its athletes or fans. Glassman has always thrived on doing the opposite of what anyone has ever figured was sensible or possible. But now Glassman's own intentions, of doing what he wants and letting others do what they want, are pressing up against each other more every day. In CrossFit, Glassman is hoisting two massive, contending ideas at once: CrossFit is an open-source workout for everyone to enjoy; CrossFit is a trademarked brand protected as viciously as a Hells Angels jacket. If it comes clattering down, it will be painful as all hell to watch. But if it succeeds? It won't be the first time a CrossFitter shocks people with how much weight he put above his head. You can bet Glassman's gonna try for another rep.
Trick And Treat - how 'healthy eating' is making us ill by Barry Groves. The author is one of the world's most outspoken proponents of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet. This book is an account of how and why the health-care establishment has got the concept of 'healthy eating' so wrong. Whereas Taubes work (see above) is a fairly straight forward review of the existing science, Groves expands into the politics of medical research and treatment to a much greater extent. "Trick and Treat" is divided into two parts. Part One describes the corruption in the health industry, points out the problems inherent in a high-carb, low-fat diet, and then prescribes a diet that leads to good health. The prescribed diet is high in fat - specifically animal fat, not polyunsaturated vegetable fat - and low in carbohydrates, with 60-70% of calories from fat, 15-25% of calories from protein, and a mere 10-15% of calories from carbohydrates. Part Two describes numerous diseases the author claims are the result of high carbohydrate consumption. These range from life-threatening disorders such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer to less serious problems such as acne, near-sightedness and dental problems. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars.
Greg Glassman and Lauren Jenai founded CrossFit, Inc. in 2000.[14][15] The company was conceived a few years earlier, in 1996, as Cross-Fit.[16] The original CrossFit gym is in Santa Cruz, California, and the first affiliated gym was CrossFit North in Seattle, Washington; there were 13 by 2005, and today there are more than 13,000.[6] Coaches associated with CrossFit include Louie Simmons, John Welbourn, Bob Harper, and Mike Burgener.[17]
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