The kettlebell starts on the ground and finishes directly overhead with the elbow locked out at full extension over the top of the shoulder and in line with the athletes head. The kettlebell must pass between the knees on the bottom portion of the movement, and does NOT have to touch the ground at the bottom of each rep. Alternating of arms is NOT required. The athlete may break up the reps between arms however they please. Changing arms must occur when the kettlebell is on the ground. You cannot change arms mid-rep or mid-air.
Overall, my biggest Whole30 lesson is that mindful eating is possible. I don't have that urge to eat everything in sight, but I also know I don't need to deprive myself or worry about food 24/7. There's a happy medium where I get to decide what I really crave, weigh whether it's worth the bloat or restless sleep I might experience after eating it, and then say yes or no. I've caught myself thinking like this more, and so the ultimate goal of Whole30 has worked: I've changed my relationship with food—for the better.
Overall, the diet is high in protein, moderate in fat (mainly from unsaturated fats), low-moderate in carbohydrate (specifically restricting high glycemic index carbohydrates), high in fiber, and low in sodium and refined sugars. [2] The monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (including the omega-3 fats EPA and DHA) come from marine fish, avocado, olive oil, and nuts and seeds.

Re: “Too old masters’ age group”… I have zero insight as to whether or not this will happen, but I’m a betting man & I’m putting my money on yes. If CrossFit lasts, which I think it will, I believe they’ll continue to evolve as the sport grows in size and age. It’ll come down to how many “too old” athletes end up being serious competitors. You’ll lead the way.
But then again, when have you found a program that is ENTIRELY ONLINE AND MOSTLY FREE that changes your life? When you are in line at the checkout with your meat and chicken thighs and raw almonds, remember the money you are going to save by NOT joining another weight-loss program or hiring a life coach or drinking booze or going to the doctor for that blood pressure you really ought to monitor which is quite possibly linked to your diet. Dallas and Melissa, the authors, say that a craving usually lasts about ten seconds. Count and breathe through the french fries someone raved about at the office. Skip out for a tiny walk while everyone is hoarding that cake at work. Eat a little roast turkey and some oven-baked potatoes. Read more books with the newfound energies. If I--a bon vivant of the kitchen, believe me, hoarder of butter, lover of booze, cream, sugar--can give these things up for thirty days, anyone can.
Get 8 classes filled with in-depth, safe, and motivating instruction covering all of the basics you need to do CrossFit effectively, while setting you up to move on to regular classes. You'll learn, get a workout, meet great people, and see what CrossFit NYC is all about. You'll also discover why so many people regard it as the best way to get fit.
So, with my sister-in-law as my Whole30 guide, I successfully followed the program for the entire month of November. The beginning was really bumpy for me — I am truly an emotional eater and I am absolutely addicted to sugar. But once it was done, it was clear to me that the benefits outweighed the challenges. I now have a whole new understanding and respect for my body and a newfound control over the food I put in my mouth. Full disclosure that the Whole30 diet affects everyone differently, but here are the seven biggest changes I saw in myself after 30 days:
An early client of Glassman's described the CrossFit experience as "agony coupled with laughter." Glassman liked that. It was as if his increasingly fit posse had a subversive secret: combinations of exercises that seemed strange and reckless and maybe dangerous to the ignorant. When Elizer, who volunteered to build the website, asked Glassman if he had a logo in mind, Glassman thought about the idea of agony mixed with laughter, then thought about thumbing his nose at all the ho-hum personal trainers he had ever endured. He came up with a vomiting clown. He called it Uncle Pukie.
Glassman reigns over this rampantly growing horde like a tribal chieftain. He now owns 100 percent of CrossFit and answers to no board of directors. Cash tends to race through the company. Until recently, the Glassmans each drew a salary of $750,000 a year; the travel and entertainment budget is in the tens of millions of dollars, and Glassman also spends money on what he calls "brand statements," including a set of $15,000 single-speed Swiss bikes and a $350,000, 1,500-horsepower fully customized 2011 Camaro convertible. (Before our visit to El Borracho, I followed him to a meeting to see about another "brand statement": custom luggage for his senior team, emblazoned with Uncle Pukie.)
Prior to starting, athletes should state their name, and show and state the weights and equipment to be used. All video submissions must be uncut and unedited in order to accurately display the performance. A clock or timer, with the running workout time clearly visible should be in the frame throughout the entire workout. Shoot the video from an angle so ALL exercises can be clearly seen meeting the movement standards. Videos shot with a fisheye lens or similar lens may be rejected due to the visual distortion these lenses cause. If an athlete needs someone to adjust their camera during the WOD to capture all movements, this is acceptable, as long as the flow of the workout and the athlete is in view the whole time.
Hi Jillian. The natural sugars in fruit really don’t help with my cravings when I’m on a Whole30, so I try to limit them as much as possible. If that’s not a problem for you, you can certainly add more into your daily plan. Personally, my most successful Whole30 was when I went the first 25 days with no fruit whatsoever. Really kicked my sugar cravings to the curb. I was a smoothie girl too.
For many years Arthur De Vany Ph.D. has been writing a book called Evolutionary Fitness on "What Evolution Teaches Us About How to Live and Stay Healthy." The diet he follows fits into my core diet definition. He may have been the first one to use the paleo diet to maximize fitness. His current site is Art's Blog on Fitness, Health, Aging, Nutrition and Exercise [archive.org].
Next, check out my gal Holly’s post about the process of reintroducing foods after completing a Whole30. As she reminds us, it’s important not to just go crazy on Day 31. Instead, “[e]xperiment with foods you miss, but do it in a way that will actually help you gather more information.” The Whole30 website also has a great post on what to do when your Whole30 is finished here.
Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health by Gary Taubes expounds on his 2002 article in the NY Times (What if It's All Been a Big Fat Lie?) and then in Science Magazine (see below). He shows how public health data has been misinterpreted to mark dietary fat and cholesterol as the primary causes of coronary heart disease. Deeper examination, he says, shows that heart disease and other diseases of civilization appear to result from increased consumption of refined carbohydrates: sugar, white flour and white rice. Or in other words, without using the word Paleolithic, he justifies the paleo diet. Here is an excellent chapter by chapter summary of the book [archive.org].
A metaresearch group at Tilburg University in the Netherlands investigates scientists’ research methods and operations, scrutinizing questionable practices such as selective reporting of statistical tests and data massaging. The group instead advocates for practices such as preregistering studies and making experimental data immediately available for open external review and verification. Its members are optimistic that “the perverse incentives of careerist academia, to hoard data and sacrifice rigor for headline-generating findings, will ultimately be fixed.”
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