Looking back on my lifestyle before the Whole30, my personal recipe for making unhealthy food choices typically consisted of being hungry and on a time crunch, which meant I'd choose whatever was most convenient (read: something overly processed from the vending machine). "Whole30 requires you to plan ahead, mainly so you stay 'compliant' and don’t go hungry," explains Liz McMahon, RDN. "Planning out meals and batch cooking ensures you have healthier food available and won’t constantly be reaching for fast food options." Making pre-planning a habit — even when I'm dining out — helps keep me on track even when I'm not following the Whole30.
In his gruff way, Glassman recounted his story for the faithful: how a novel, exquisitely punishing system of exercise he had designed, centered on the WOD (workout of the day; it's pronounced "wad"), had started in his backwater Santa Cruz gym, then turned into an online phenomenon, then paved the way for 6,775 CrossFit locations (soon to be 10,000), and now was fast becoming its own sport. (This month, the finals of the CrossFit Games will be broadcast live on ESPN2.) He explained the contrarian way he thinks about the CrossFit business (he shuns most new sources of revenue) and how he goes about protecting its brand (viciously).
You're not tracking calories. You won't feel hungry. You won't be eating based on a points system. You're going to miss your morning doughnuts, but this isn't like any diet you might be used to. Whole30 co-founder Melissa Hartwig actually doesn't like calling the Whole30 a "diet" at all. “Most diets are spent white-knuckling your way through deprivation, restriction, hunger, tuning out your body’s signals, and obsessing over tracking and weighing your food,” Hartwig says. She doesn't think that type of behavior is sustainable, and if you've ever tried dieting, you probably agree.
1) Many of the recipes are complicated, like REALLY complicated. Some requiring as many as 20 ingredients to complete. Others require uncommon ingredients, which will likely not be reused, especially if there isn't another recipe in the book asking for it. Something I appreciated in the 30 Day Guide was that ingredients were frequently used in more than one recipe so they were worth the investment.
A program fit and scale-able to anyone who decides to make the commitment to be better.  We utilize compound movements through body-weight, weightlifting and conditioning elements, at varying times of duration and intensity.  The result, a fully capable and efficient athlete that is ready to take on any task life or athletics throws at it and a body that looks the part.
Re: “Too old masters’ age group”… I have zero insight as to whether or not this will happen, but I’m a betting man & I’m putting my money on yes. If CrossFit lasts, which I think it will, I believe they’ll continue to evolve as the sport grows in size and age. It’ll come down to how many “too old” athletes end up being serious competitors. You’ll lead the way.
Whole30 is about a physiological and psychological reset (so, not just about the number on the scale), and if you’re looking to jumpstart your system and make healthier food choices, the 30-day plan may be a good guide for you. “It’s really for someone who is looking to make drastic changes for a short period of time and understands this is a band-aid, not a cure all,” says Zeitlin.
Greg Glassman and Lauren Jenai founded CrossFit, Inc. in 2000.[14][15] The company was conceived a few years earlier, in 1996, as Cross-Fit.[16] The original CrossFit gym is in Santa Cruz, California, and the first affiliated gym was CrossFit North in Seattle, Washington; there were 13 by 2005, and today there are more than 13,000.[6] Coaches associated with CrossFit include Louie Simmons, John Welbourn, Bob Harper, and Mike Burgener.[17]
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